Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Magnets do not go with  - Some hair springs, Watch tools, Automatic works, calendar works in fact anything that is used in a mechanical time piece that is non magnetic.

Magnets do go with - Iron filings, etchasketch game, door catches, motors, speakers, pickups, pinged away springs and components.

My advice - Move all magnetic devices away from your work area. I have one of the rubber mats you mention and I have removed the magnets from them so I can use it in my work area. Do this and they can be useful - do not and you will suffer the effects.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 61
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Cousins sell an antistatic bench mat with the label A*F Switzerland. It consists of two layers the upper green and lower white. Between the two is a space that in the sample that I purchased contained

No, but when we go down to the sea we are supercharged.

246ft above sea level here in the Essex alps. if this global warming cobblers continues, I should end up with a beach front property.

Posted Images

14 hours ago, wls1971 said:

Introducing anything magnetic into the work space when repairing watches is a no no I cannot see where it would be useful to have such a mat in watch repair. The only magnet I have is for those unfortunate times when a part does ping off into the distance I do a sweep of the floor with a magnet finds the part 99% of the time.

Now if your a big tea drinker I have a Chocolate teapot for sale somewhere.

Come to think of it, maybe he thought I was asking for flooring ?

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I use a vinyl board cover that you can get in larger sizes than the Bergeon mats. They come in larger pre-cut sizes and are a little cheaper in cost. I just obtained a large sheet and cut it to fit the entire table top. They usually come in the light green color and clean up easily. You can find them online in art supply houses or mechanical drafting supply houses and usually go by Vyco or Borco in the US.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is it that watchmaking work mats are always green? What's so special about the color green? I'm almost certain there's some traditional material-based reason, but I really don't know what it is. Anyone have any insight into that dark corner of horology?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, spectre6000 said:

Why is it that watchmaking work mats are always green? What's so special about the color green? I'm almost certain there's some traditional material-based reason, but I really don't know what it is. Anyone have any insight into that dark corner of horology?

To calm you down when you lose a balance shock spring, or screwdriver slips.

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi According to the great and the good  the colour green was chosen because it reflects the right amount of light creating less eye strain. Not to mention as  Old  Hippy said you can find the parts easier. The colour green is in the middle of the spectrum of visible light. Blue/purple being the longest and the reds being the lowest in distance .

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • jdm changed the title to Bench Mat
  • jdm pinned this topic

Parts are mostly on the white to red spectrum with a little blue thrown in. Highly reflective. A matte mat makes sense for the reflectivity. Green and red are on opposite ends of the spectrum, but I was exaggerating/simplifying a bit with red and thinking copper. Thinking historically, it's not hard to imagine a watchmaker 100 years ago would have used a vegetable tanned-tan leather mat. About the right durometer. I've done a fair amount of leather work, and even did some semi-formal experimentation with leather treatments from that era, and I'm not aware of anything that results in that characteristic green. Rubbers in that era were, actually about the same color or black, but the black was early vulcanized and quite hard. The only other thing I can think of would be green velvet. That would likely be a covering over something, but if the knap (I think that's the term) was long enough, the fibers would "grab" anything and keep it from bouncing. I think I've seen cloth covered writing desks with green pads, and it seems like this could be a similar situation. I don't think they were velvet, or if they were, the knap was long gone. I could be way off base...

Edited by spectre6000
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...