Jump to content
  • 0

Quartz book


markr
 Share

Question

I'm looking to get a beginners book on quartz watch repair.  I'm just looking for the basics.  I could not find quartz watch repair for dummies. Any suggestions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Hi Mark  attached are a couple of manuals, The Witschi one is quite general and the SMQ deals with the Bulova  the principals are the same.    Henry B Freid also has a book "Repairing Quartz Watches," that one I have and can recomend as a good starting point             cheers

Witschi Training Course.pdf SMQ Service Manual Bulova.pdf

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
2 hours ago, markr said:

I'm looking to get a beginners book on quartz watch repair.

I've never repaired a quartz watch and will likely never do that. Not because I don't like quartz watches, but because I'm more into mechanical watches. Anyway, I have serviced an ETA quartz movement (Calibre 955.112) and was surprised to see how the non-electronic parts were basically the same as in a mechanical watch. Anyway, If it's of any use to you, you'll find my service walkthrough of that ETA quartz movement here.

Edited by VWatchie
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
4 hours ago, markr said:

I'm looking to get a beginners book on quartz watch repair

No book is needed for a beginner, but a "line release" box is. Or at least a demagnetizer. Next,  after that failing check or replace coil.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
43 minutes ago, jdm said:

No book is needed for a beginner, but a "line release" box is. Or at least a demagnetizer. Next,  after that failing check or replace coil.

I would avoid a demagnetiser on electonic circuits, personally. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

There are many pulse testers available online. Get one that can check battery voltage, do line release and test for a motor pulse. Some of the newer ones can even test the timing accuracy. 

To test the coil, all you need is a multimeter set to resistance testing mode.

But to test the current consumption of the circuit, I'm afraid there is no easy way. I use a Bulova Accutron test meter which was designed to test tuning fork watches but can be used to give a rough idea of the consumption current. A proper quartz watch testing machine, like those made by Witschi, is not something that a hobbyist would buy.

My mentor explained to me why a professional watchmaker might not want to buy a Witschi quartz tester. If you test a watch that your customer brings in and pronounce it defective and then the customer brings it to another watchmaker who just replaces the battery and charges for it, the customer would think you are incompetent. 

Then when the battery fails after 6 months, he would just replace the battery again and tell you if it dies in six months again, you'll need to service the watch or buy a new one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
13 hours ago, Plato said:

I would avoid a demagnetiser on electonic circuits, personally. 

That is how a "line free" device works - an electromagnetic field to give the motor that extra impulse which may be needed to win over congealed oil or what else could be blocking the train.. Since I don't have one, I use a demagnetizer for mechanical watches, that is pretty much the same . A short pulse is all one needs and if positive, the result is immediately visible.
I have numerous successes and never damaged anything. That is no surprise, because the miniature "electronic circuit" of a typical quartz module, doers not have any special characteristic which makes it vulnerable by magnetic fields. Furthermore, when a quartz module of average cost EUR 5 has stopped, there is really nothing to lose in trying what I have explained above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
5 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

But to test the current consumption of the circuit, I'm afraid there is no easy way.

There is no immediate easy way, but what one can do is to use a sensitive digital multimeter, approx EUR 40, and build the small fixture which is needed to insert it between a battery and the watch under test.

 

5 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

My mentor explained to me why a professional watchmaker might not want to buy a Witschi quartz tester. If you test a watch that your customer brings in and pronounce it defective and then the customer brings it to another watchmaker who just replaces the battery and charges for it, the customer would think you are incompetent. 

That makes no sense to me . First, replace the battery, if it works in most case job is done, period. Only if there are doubts, or the customer complain of short battery life, then one can explore further, explaining the customer in full before and after in doing that. But if the customer is not interested in that stuff, or the material value of the watch does not warrant extra work, deliver as it is and move one. If you look at the few competent watchmakers that don't snob working on quartz (Archer is an example), they have all the costly gear, and for what they charge, it will pay back eventually.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
25 minutes ago, jdm said:

That is how a "line free" device works - an electromagnetic field to give the motor that extra impulse which may be needed to win over congealed oil or what else could be blocking the train.. Since I don't have one, I use a demagnetizer for mechanical watches, that is pretty much the same . A short pulse is all one needs and if positive, the result is immediately visible.
I have numerous successes and never damaged anything. That is no surprise, because the miniature "electronic circuit" of a typical quartz module, doers not have any special characteristic which makes it vulnerable by magnetic fields. Furthermore, when a quartz module of average cost EUR 5 has stopped, there is really nothing to lose in trying what I have explained above.

Doesn't the line release tool have a rotating electromagnetic field (Horotec Turbo) whereas the demagnetiser (the one I'm thinking of - Antimag 2) creates a large pulse followed by pulses of smaller magnitude? Maybe for an analogue quartz it would be OK but I wouldn't put it near anything digital... or am I confusing the issue with old magnetic storage media?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
4 hours ago, Plato said:

Doesn't the line release tool have a rotating electromagnetic field (Horotec Turbo) whereas the demagnetiser (the one I'm thinking of - Antimag 2) creates a large pulse followed by pulses of smaller magnitude?

You are talking about Swiss branded products, which are costly and as as buying incentive may deliver additional features.

While I'm referring to the typical, low priced, China made "quartz line release", or "blue box demag", or even "Bergeon 3321 copy". These all deliver a pulse that is as long as you press the button.

 

4 hours ago, Plato said:

or am I confusing the issue with old magnetic storage media?

Yes, I believe you are. Back in the stone age, my 3.5" floppy disks and their external unit could not stand even close to the CRT monitors without becoming corrupted. Lucky, these troubles are now a thing of the past.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I know submerging the movement in lighter fluid for ten to fifteen seconds would not hurt its electronics. 

So if you drop the movement with battery fitted and running, in lighter fluid for ten seconds, old dried oil will somewhat dissolve, take the movement out let dry as its runing. 

In case this movement has no electronic issue, it will keep good time again for couple of months plus you know all it needs is a clean and lube. 

Just a dummn idea thats known to work.🧐

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
3 hours ago, Plato said:

I'm tempted to see if I can break anything with my demagnetiser!!

Surely one can. Spinning the hands that fast on a quartz is the same as winding without the pallets fork in place on a mechanical. Do that long enough and something will break.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Basic checj=ks can be done with a muiltimeter. Re Hectors post, Depending on the quality and ranges will limit what you can do so always but a good one.

I use a purpose built tools for checking and testing quartz watches and also coupled with two home built devices all of which do a good job. This has been discussed before so have a look via the search box on the home page. My line release is a small mains transformer with the appropriate fuses and switch which when activated creates a magnetic field which pulses the rotor that moves the hands round in a controlled manner, lack of contol can damage the watch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...