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Pallet fork lubrication: pallets and pivots.


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Ok, I think I will open a can of worms, but here goes:

 

How do you oil the pallet jewels?

 

I know there are several ways to do it. I would be very thankful if some reasoning or pros/cons would be presented. And also, how could one check if they are properly oiled. I think the correct oiling of the pallet jewels is one of the critical things in watch servicing.

 

Thank you,

Bogdan

 

 

 

p.s. I saw Mark's way... don't think it's the only one. I also expect him to have something to say in this topic  :) if he finds the time

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So it's pretty straightforward, you just oil the damn thing, right?

 

 

...only once or three times at 5 teeth interval; when it's stopped or in motion, 941 or something else, epilame or not, how do you check you've done it right...

 

 

Come on! Is it a trade secret or it's some sort of blasphemy my question? You all do it (those who clean and oil watches), my question is how and why?

Bogdan

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Assembe movement and let it run 5 minst. Afterwards I do it using 9415 on every second teth tip of the escape wheel.

Only on the tip of it not on the top or bottom of the wheel

I check it under the microscope after 24hours of work if its not enough i do it once more

Enough is when the escape wheel tip and the pallet jewel meet you shoul see a droplet of oil between them which is aprox. 30% of the pallet jewel tip length(its dificult to explain)

And of course i use epilame as it makes this job a lot easier and the grease stays in place afterwards and does not travel along the surface which will leave the pallet jewels dry, at the begining i said let it run 5 mins, this will wear of the epilame coating and will leave the oil on that places.

I hope i made it a bit clearer for you now

br

emso

p.s: sent from my s****y phone so sorry for typing mistakes

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Great info.. Is there any tutorial on the site for using epilame? I've never used it, just oiled the pallet stones before fitting. I am now concerned after reading about the oil spreading, and leaving the escape wheel dry over a long period of time.

You treat the whole escape wheel with epilame, and only the pallet fork jewels (avoid epilame on pallet staff).

Assemble the watch let it run 10-15 mins to the contact point between escape wheell/pallet jewels epilame is worn out then you apply 9415 and you test after 24hours if less than needed then you reaplly more.

And yes youre right, drying the escape is main reason for watch stopping after 1-2 years after servicce

I have seen amplitude of 120 degrees over the years before applying the 9415 and after applying

p.s: sent from my s****y phone so sorry for typing mistakes

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  • 5 months later...

Have a new little project .A vostok 2409A watch . Have actually serviced almost the whole movement but have seen in a video that the pallet fork ends should be oiled . Can't find the video . What oil shold i use ? Have D-5 or 9410 . Or is their any other i can use . Is it ok to skip the oil .

 

post-644-0-32728500-1425068110_thumb.jpg

Edited by rogart63
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I think you can get away with Moebius 9410. It sometimes it is ok to use it instead of 9415 and/or 941 (I think those are the numbers, first for high bit movements and second for low bit movements).

Edited by bobm12
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Since we're on the subject of lubricants, what basic lubricants (oil and grease) should the hobbyist have on hand?

 

This is a great question. It would be nice to see a list of lubricants with an acceptable substitute/multi-use suggested. I have a small fortune invested in many oils/greases and the shelf life is only so many years and I'll never use them up.

 

Mark, although you're a pro and would have on hand all needed oils and greases, is there anything you can put together that would help us novices/hobbists?

 

Many thanks in advance and I'll follow this closely. :)

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Hi all,

I believe we have extensive info on oils on the site where the questions here have been answered. Just do a search "oils" or "lubricants". If I remember well there is a viscosity equivalence chart that may be very helpful...

Cheers,

Bob

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You are welcome gotwatch, I'm glad you found what you were looking for. I figured it was a better way considering the tons of opinions and information already on the site. Please, don't hesitate to ask more questions, I didn't mean anything by the suggestion, just wanted to be helpful.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Bought six Vostok movement to work on . Needed a better balance than the one i got . Hopefully there is one in the movements a bought . like to work on this movement as they are easy to find parts .And the parts are very cheap . This is the service work done by someone at WUS . The movement is a 2414 but that is similar to the 2409 .http://forums.watchuseek.com/f54/vostok-caliber-2414-service-notes-very-long-many-pics-226237.html

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