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Certina 13-20 Walkthrough


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My first week of vacation I got hurt in my back playing superman while lifting 24-wheelers with one arm. Unfortunately, I’m not 20 any more so I had to limp for a week bent like a U after the show ended.
So today I felt like I could make a strong comeback so I wanted to put me to a test, in doing that I whipped out the smallest woman’s watch from the man cave I could find and off I went. What better way to spend a sunday off.
This walkthrough will not show any disassembly since I also only had the smallest camera I could find at hand. I fast forward until the point everything been properly cleaned and I just have to magically piece everything together.
To save place at the site I compiled everything into one PDF enjoy…     Cetina 13-20 Build Walkthrough.pdf

Here we can see the movement beside its bigger brother.

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Is the big brother a Chrono grade and if not what makes it a good grade luxury watch.

TIA 

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8 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

Is the big brother a Chrono grade and if not what makes it a good grade luxury watch.

They are just chronograde for so long, don't know of so many sending them back for re-certification.

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4 hours ago, HSL said:

They are just chronograde for so long, don't know of so many sending them back for re-certification.

So what do owners want recertification for? are not all in-house Certinas Chronograde? or we like certification to verify our watch still performs up to Chronograde?  or that it is not a fake.

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After you serviced a chronometer graded watch and even perhaps switched parts in it you can’t guarantee it performs after the specifications, of course the text will be there but otherwise it isn’t the same watch as in the beginning. Very few workshops have the ability to test a watch according to the COSC standard. Even fewer hobbyists.

Rolex might send some chrono-grade watches back, but no one hardly would do that with a Certina for a fraction of the price.

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 Knowing you to be a Certina enthusiast and I owe Rogart63, I have been keeping an eye open for Certina for sale on domestic sites, there is a 919-1 Certina, square case , with imperfect dial paint, decent price, you pay. ha ha🤠

 I wonder if a regulare balance complete for 919-1 exists and could have been fittef in this piece. Unfortunate my tablet wont cooperate to send you a picture of it. 

Regs Joe

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22 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

you pay. ha ha🤠

 

lol, yes Rogart63 lives just around the corner in the town below mine.
I already have a couple of nice 919-1, my favourite sits in a Argonaut 285..

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Great and entertaining walkthrough. Thanks!

"Either the summer heat or the 26 beers made me sloppy but I revers and fast forward and by magic
I’m back in track."

Definitely the "summer heat" being the culprit here! 😆

Just out of curiosity, what would you say is the diameter of the smallest jewel in this movement? The smallest pusher in my Seitz jeweling tool set is 0.65 mm and I guess that would be way too wide if you needed to adjust end shake.

 

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3 hours ago, VWatchie said:

Just out of curiosity, what would you say is the diameter of the smallest jewel in this movement? The smallest pusher in my Seitz jeweling tool set is 0.65 mm and I guess that would be way too wide if you needed to adjust end shake.

Took a measurement and the smallest jewel on this one actually is seven hundred of a millimeter (0.7mm).
I guess one can’t have them too small of practical reasons since you need a hole for the pivot, an oil cup and some space in the sides. The tricky part is to see how to lubricate without making a mess around the whole jewel. The ones on the train is slightly larger.

So no problems adjusting the end shake...
OilCheck.thumb.png.a6b57192e7cc074ce4c541e5d7ce9cc0.png

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57 minutes ago, HSL said:

So no problems adjusting the end shake...

Thanks, that's good to know (I have never serviced a ladies watch movement)! So, obviously the jewels aren't sized in proportion to the rest of the movement. I replaced a cracked pallet fork jewel (80/10) on the main plate of a Vostok 2414 yesterday, and it was pretty fiddly. A 0.8 mm diameter doesn't sound all that small but it sure feels small to handle. A 0.7 mm jewel would probably feel twice as tiny.

Oh BTW, that oiling looks absolutely perfect! Beautiful!

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