Jump to content
  • 0

Rolex bracelet repair


LittleWatchShop
 Share

Question

My neighbor asked me to look at his Rolex.  His bracelet broke a long time ago, so he bought another Rolex rather than have the bracelet repaired.

You can see in these pictures that there is stress on the metal that wraps around the pin. 

Will the metal stand the stress if I bend it back around the pen...or will it be too risky?

2021-07-09 12_05_43-IMG_7419.JPG ‎- Photos.png

2021-07-09 12_05_18-IMG_7418.JPG ‎- Photos.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Probably not as the metal is already fatigued and any re forming weill over stress the metal. It may hold for a while but will break again.  A bit poor for that class of watch though.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
1 hour ago, watchweasol said:

Probably not as the metal is already fatigued and any re forming weill over stress the metal. It may hold for a while but will break again.  A bit poor for that class of watch though.

Kinda what I figured as well.  Here is a possible solution that appears very inexpensive.  Pretty sure it is the correct piece.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Your jeweler can fix this.

 Use a torch  to bring the stressed part to a glow, it will bend with ease and wont break then. Some folks solder more metal onto the streesed seam,  then file to shape and polish. 

It might eventually break again as weasol says.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Since it’s a Rolex, and what looks like probably quite a fancy one, I’d get a replacement link, or buy a European or USA-made link and adapt it to fit and re-finish to match. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
10 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

I assume one should use silver solder rather then 60/40 lead solder??

Sorry, I don't know what to use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

That link is toast, you should change that link there are lots of them out there.
Some curiosity about this one 62523-H14 F3, the clasp tells a story to F3 says it was made around 1981.  It should have stainless and 14 carat gold links. The broken bracelet matches the Rolex in the picture. You need two fittings too if they gone lost when someone changed the bracelet.
You can change that link yourself without any problems and the best thing is the bay is filled with them, would be a shame to not fix it properly. Just push out the pin holding it in place a 10-minute fix.

Edited by HSL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
26 minutes ago, HSL said:

That link is toast

Yes, I have come to agree with that conclusion!!

I have the whole bracelet as shown here.  I will just find the last link (the broken one). 

2021-07-10 12_06_12-IMG_7421.JPG ‎- Photos.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

It looks like wear to me. I would check all the links are secure, especially the end link in the other side which will probably have the same design and be similarly weakened.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I received the end piece that I found on Ebay.  You can see in the picture after I attached it.  Notice that the end piece I bought was meant for the OTHER bracelet section--as such it is too wide.

I only paid $120 for this, so not much invested so far.

I am thinking of just cutting it and polishing out my cut.  Notice that the replacement piece uses heavier gauge metal.  This is a good thing as long as it fits once the buckle is closed.

Three factors to consider: 1) the bracelet is currently useless unless I do something, 2) the end piece I bought is only a minimal investment, and 3) if I ruin the end piece that I bought, the rest of the bracelet remains pure.

Comments???

2021-07-24 10_40_57-Drawing1 - Microsoft Visio.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I’m not sure if you would be able to simply cut the width of the link down. If you look at the original part then I think the narrow section is longer than the corresponding link on the other side. There is a flat on the link. It may be ok if you simply cut the link down, but you would need to check that it interfaces correctly when the bracelet is closed. 
 

Also, in case you don’t know already, the riveted pins are removable - don’t attempt to open any links to press them around the riveted pin - just buy a new pin. I repaired a badly damaged Rolex sub bracelet last week. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hello to all! My name is Mircea and I am thrilled to be a member of the WRT, as I already used many of your advices in my newly discovered hobby, repairing watches! I do know what means watchmaking, but I just started a few months ago in repairing timepieces, so watchmaking is a long way to come yet... I live in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and I do make my living in a completely different field, ie health services... But I always liked to know how things work and how can they can be repaired, if needed. While a year ago I only had one watch, now I own severals, mainly vintage and of Russian origin. The first watch that I put together was a DIY watch bought from Taiwan in a mail order kit, with a NH35 movement and a very nice diver case, dial and hands. I enjoyed it that much that I started to look on the Internet about various topics on watches and watchmaking, started to seek watchmakers in my area and found one that supplied me with a few broken watches to play with. Well, that was the beginning , changing quartz movements in a few watches and finally dismantling and reassembling a few mechanical ones. With a lot of advice from the internet, and especially WRT (THANK YOU ALL FOR THAT), I succeded in repairing  with very good results two mechanical watches, a Cardinal Russian with a 2609HA movement and an Altantic Worldmaster Swiss with a UN 6300N movement. I am proud to have them working at less than +/- 2s/day precision, good amplitude and very low beat error, and they became a valued part of my watch collection for good. Much more to come... Well, time is limited so please be patient with me, as I do not know a lot yet, but I am eager to learn and as pasionate as everyone here! Thank you in advance! See you around in the forum!
    • Thank you for the link hippy.  My concern at this point is how to hold the balance in the lathe.  Chucks like on a lathe or a pin vise are good at holding simple cylindrical objects, like drill bits or a cylinder of whatever you're about to cut into. But a balance is a complex surface and I'm having trouble envisioning how exactly it would fit into the lathe chuck.
    • I am guessing this is akin to tuning a piano and is an acquired skill. One thing I saw on a 7750 I worked on was the finger was up high up on the gear. Not all of the finger face was touching the gear. I thought it was bent and I was thinking about bending it down. I decided to leave it alone as it was working. Matt
    • Bulova Seaking Automatic from 1975 I believe. Just restored and serviced this for my next door neighbour. It's 'on test' for the next day. He told me he got it for his tenth wedding anniversary and has been in a drawer for 25 years or so. Going to give it back to him tomorrow evening. I hope he will be pleased to wear it again. 
×
×
  • Create New...