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Automatic would not De-Power, what did I miss?


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I was disassembling a Hamilton 667. I had removed the auto winding assembly, and attempted to disengage the click while holding the crown and nothing would move.

I attached a heavy flat sided pin vise to the crown to prevent a wild run out and then removed the pallet, still nothing

When I loosened the screws up f the gear train bridge it finally un wound through the train. I grabbed the pin vise in time to keep it from over speeding. Thankfully it was not fully wound. 
I know I missed something but did not see it in the inspection of the disassembly.

Any ideas? All theories including those involving a conspiracy of the CIA and Martians are welcome.

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Most likely the movement is gummed up with dry lubricant. I presume it was a non runner before the strip down. The other issue to look for damaged wheels or pivots.

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What would you do different if you had a second chance at it?   The only thing I can think of is taking the balance and fork out and drop the whole thing in lighter fluid and see if that helps free it up.  

I proceed as usual, give it a good clean and check every part under good magnification  and upon reassembly test that each part is doing it job,  check all shakes.

Good luck

 

 

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Yes it was/is a non-runner. I have de-powered many movements, but this one surprised me. I just wanted to what better repair people might think.

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One of your clues here should've been if the pallet fork is out  and you can wind the crown  and nothing is happening as far as the train spinning you know that there's a problem. If you can wind the watch you should have been able to release the click and  it should've unwound.. But as others have pointed out if it's so incredibly bad oil holding everything in place then you have an interesting problem..

3 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

What would you do different if you had a second chance at it?   The only thing I can think of is taking the balance and fork out and drop the whole thing in lighter fluid and see if that helps free it up. 

What's interesting about this suggestion is  a lot of modern watch repair shops do something called pre-cleaning. This is where the watches assembled  minus the hands and dial of course through a separate cleaning machine.. It's usually a really short cycle it so that when you're disassembling the watch  parts can be inspected because now they're clean.. Repairs can be made  watch can be verified that it runs before the final cleaning..

Personally I like to put hairspring rinse on things  when they really gummed up.. Which would be equivalent to the lighter fluid..

Your clue is  for the future if you cannot let the power off with the click  and the power does not go through the gear train disassembling would not be a good idea until you can verify that you can turn the crown and the wheels spin and no power is being held anywhere.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I would take balance and fork out, per clean, try gently encouraging to turn each wheel in the train.  

If you attempt disassembling without depowering, the movement might at some point violently come apart. 

 

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