Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This little watch intrigued me so I wanted to see it for myself.

I wasn't planing on liking it so much, now I'd like a full restoration. The problem is that it's my 1st non-Swiss watch. I have no idea where to send it.

Does anyone know a 607/618 expert?

 

s-l500ev.jpg.22ed3cea56fd12d0285b9d8232f1632a.jpgs-l500wrgt.jpg.40785d94381f2399d5f527e61917d40e.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

So...Instead of sending it out, I decided to go on a shopping spree.

I'm now researching lubricants and cleaners. Expensive little hobby you folks have here.

(And yes...I have a couple junk 607 movements to play with before the good one gets messed with)

thumbnailzghs.jpg.a5cad69c903ba847e0c1f7d59c0ad3f0.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I,d be extra careful with its overcoil. 

Adjusting in four positions is also challanging. 

Mainspring is the uncommon two piece too, so I start looking for a replacement.

Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Nucejoe said:

Good luck.

Thank You...I might be picking your brain later. I was careful to remove the regulator 1st and unhook/unscrew the balance wheel hairspring before doing anything else. I'm looking into a product called One Dip to see if there is a consensus on its beneficial use.

I had a bit of luck while looking for parts movements and picked up what looks like a NOS round case bumper. I'm not sure if it's a 607 or a 618 because I'm trying to locate a tool. I thought a "screw-ball" would do the trick but it is really stuck.

1279088061_ElginBumper.thumb.jpg.623efc7c4298277e2b1084ea35b9306e.jpg

thumbnailfbbg.thumb.jpg.b54087f87736f2dfd244f511bbf5d9e5.jpg

Beautiful though and almost/maybe 70 yrs old.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now for cleaning...

1) Zippo ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes for everything except the escape wheel, pallet fork & balance/hairspring.

2) Remove from bath and peg wood all jewel holes & anything else that looks dirty.

3) Zippo ultrasonic rinse for another 5 min.

4) One-Dip escape wheel, pallet fork & balance+hairspring. Hand clean end stones & jewels on regulator w/ One-dip also.

5) Treat escape wheel & pallet stones with Epilame.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, SuspectDevice said:

5) Treat escape wheel & pallet stones with Epilame.

Epilame did not exist at the these watches were made, yet they could attain remarkable "railroad" precision. One wonders if it is really needed for beginner then. 

In my opinion a better approach would be to avoid smoker's products and maybe use a specific product to brighen the movement. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All clean and waiting on a spring winder from the UK. I started to assemble it but had to stop.

Everything went well except I think I'll wash the barrel & lid with the main plate next time because they were so dirty that they needed an additional rinse. 

I found 3 tiny screws in the dirty solution that I didn't remove from the watch. That was puzzling. They look kinda like those screws on the balance wheel and are about jewel cap size but are steel. I never used my orange (0.05mm) screwdriver once but they are that size with a really pointy end.

Also, the yoke spring was horrible looking and appeared home made. It also looked like someone smashed it in there with a center punch & was a real problem to get out. Not sure what I'm going to do about that.

thumbnailrgg.jpg.565d1f093f59eb6222d5b533bc2fa307.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, markr said:

Are the screws for the dial?  They vibrate out sometimes.

They have a shoulder and are smaller. The only screws I've seen with a sharp point. No clue where they came from.

I did ultrasonic my oscillator bridge but the jewel cap screws are still on it. Plus, there are 3 of them???

thumbnailaergaegr.jpg.3aad0b141a4b4b85b76590790eb137e4.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The most satisfying tiny little click was when the train bridge dropped into place. I was tickling it for so long that peg wood fibers were accumulating on the gears. (about 30 min)

Next up was oiling the center wheel and I totally messed that up. I approached with a large drop of 1300 and it sucked it in so fast that I couldn't pull the oiler away in time. Lesson learned. No way I'm pulling the bridge off to clean the excess oil. I tried sopping it up with rodico but I'm pretty sure there is still too much on there.

The 9010 went fine. I switched to a smaller oiler and only put enough on it to lubricate the bearing. Same thing though, it sucked it in very quickly.

The pallet fork & cock where easy. Still waiting on the winder from the UK.

thumbnaileqfvvte.jpg.2558d3c861156ca5b7cce0a2bb5a4990.jpg

Edited by SuspectDevice
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/16/2021 at 12:04 PM, jdm said:

Epilame did not exist at the these watches were made, yet they could attain remarkable "railroad" precision. One wonders if it is really needed for beginner then. 

In my opinion a better approach would be to avoid smoker's products and maybe use a specific product to brighen the movement. 

as you're a beginner it seems like may be perhaps rather than spending money on Epilame you could probably find something else to spend your money on better.

Then the second paragraph above cryptically at least it was cryptic for me is indicating he should look at some of the discussions we've had on cleaning products. It's amazing what these modern cleaning solutions for watches can do for you. Because spending time and effort with marginal cleaning fluids long term is not going to have the desired results you want and even if you do use surface treatment on a few components the other components are going to have issues eventually.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

as you're a beginner it seems like may be perhaps rather than spending money on Epilame you could probably find something else to spend your money on better.

Then the second paragraph above cryptically at least it was cryptic for me is indicating he should look at some of the discussions we've had on cleaning products. It's amazing what these modern cleaning solutions for watches can do for you. Because spending time and effort with marginal cleaning fluids long term is not going to have the desired results you want and even if you do use surface treatment on a few components the other components are going to have issues eventually.

Yes...I think I walked into a discussion about Epilame that was over my head for a beginner. I also found the topic of cleaning solutions to be very confusing and so I went with something I thought was simple. Everything is new to me and I'm trying to make sense of it all. So far I have not destroyed or lost anything so I'm feeling pretty good about that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

7 minutes ago, SuspectDevice said:

So far I have not destroyed or lost anything so I'm feeling pretty good about that.

 

my bad you're doing good don't worry about it you doing fine

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

IT LIVES!

thumbnailrheth.thumb.jpg.5fb886fe3e4eccf3f9063116e7dcaca6.jpg

I haven't done the 9015 yet but the little fellow just really wanted to tick again.

The winder came today and it's good that I had an old spring to play with because this happened twice when I was trying to reposition my fingers to feed the braking attachment into the winder. I got the hang of it after a few tries and my new spring went together without too much drama.

thumbnaildgtd.thumb.jpg.357d488ebed376d17be4f38d1a16b30d.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

All back together & a new strap.

Apologies to Markr, the screws were from the dial & the 3rd one was the hairspring stud retaining screw.

The timegrapher results were mixed. I have to work on correcting beat error & getting better at oiling.

And yes...It bump winds!

thumbnailRDggr.thumb.jpg.08bcc43550bc607a11ccd8d09c88992b.jpg

FFFFFFFFFF.thumb.png.b9136ae5dd7839dd9d258096f7a4a5f0.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Nucejoe has made some good points about the calendar mechanism. If the watch physically stops at least the hands stop and the secondhand keeps going that means the watch train is running it means that it's a disconnect between the gear train and our minute hand in calendar mechanism. The Canon opinion which I'm going but I guess is the type that snaps into a drive wheel. The drive wheel is driven by the gear train the Canon pinion goes on the post there is no friction there. If the friction between the drive wheel in the Canon pinion disintegrates which he can then with the least amount of friction like a calendar mechanism it just quit striving. The hands come to a stop the watch keeps running the secondhand keeps moving because it's independence of all of this. It should have been obvious when the watch was going to gather and you check the setting mechanism before you put the calendar on you would have noticed zero friction as a guess. Even now when you go into hands setting you'll feel like there's no friction at all. Then the reason why the calendar mechanism works when you manually rotate the hands is because the setting wheel is driving the Canon pinion directly which is driving the calendar mechanism and that our wheel and all of that so all of that will run from that we just will not run from the gear train running the drive wheel that's connected to the Canon pinion. But that's just my wild guess and then we throw in Nucejoe's possible calendar mechanism increased friction than we need to really isolate all of this or we can continue to guess.  
    • I am not sure if I correctly understand you here. Only the seconds hand keeps running or minute and hour hands do move too, in case minute and hour hands move and show time right, then the fault is in date change train including date jumper mech, but if it doesn't show time correctly ( appear to loose time) then its loose canon pinion. You can tighten a loose canon pinion, use grease to lube it, not oil.
    • Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.
    • always confusing when it's two separate watches but I'm going to assume they're basically identical. What was their condition before you service them in other words did have a problem before and the problem came after you've serviced or was the problems there before? Then timing machine results you do have a timing machine don't you? In other words what's the running condition of the watch like of the watches barely running that would be an issue for a calendar change   then you fix the problem? so I'm guessing we only have to worry about the 2778 then? Yes this is what happens when you have multiple watches with too much going on it becomes confusing. then it would be helpful to have a picture of the dial side components because we didn't memorize every single calendar change mechanism. one of the places to look is the Canon pinion assembly in other words to visit have enough force to drive the calendar mechanism? I'm having to guess because I'm not finding a good tech sheet that shows the parts. If it's a kinda Canon pinion I think which is the Canon pinion that slips into her presses into with friction with the wheel if it no longer has and the friction then a cannot drive the calendar but if you manually set the watch that drives the Canon pinion directly and everything should function. then if you two of the parts list it would be listed as canon pinion with drive wheel. .But it would be helpful in the picture just to make sure http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&ETA_2778  
    • I think what the problem here is you're asking the wrong question. The question is what part number do I need so that I can end up with the correct balance? Or the correct balance staff for that matter? If you look at the second link it lists the parts for your watch. This is always where things get interesting? you'll notice for balance staff they list seven different ones. For balance complete they do show three but if you look at the part numbers there's only two. then I attached some images from bestfit online and of course additional problems perhaps. Notice you have lots of choices and probably only one that's right. then the physical bestfit book becomes interesting because is an indication that there are variations which is of course why there so many listed in the images. but fortunately it looks like you want the basic simple one which should be 100/66.  unfortunately for the third link it's out of stock. then providing this is the right staff number I snipped out a couple of more images of the bestfit book which is what the dimensions mean and the dimensions. One of the irritating things of the physical book is on the dimension chart if you're trying to find a particular staff you just have to be lucky to go through the list and find it it be really nice if they list of the sizes by the numeric staff also. http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&AS_1287 http://cgi.julesborel.com/cgi-bin/matcgi2?ref=AS_1287 http://cgi.julesborel.com/cgi-bin/matcgi2?ref=U\ZD]J http://www.julesborel.com/s.nl/it.A/id.151223/.f  
×
×
  • Create New...