Jump to content

Interesting new watch tech from Frederique Constant


Recommended Posts

I saw this posted on The Watch Site.  Apparently, Frederique Constant is releasing a 40hz mechanical watch using a single-piece silicon balance in place of the traditional Swiss lever. I watched the video at the link below and was pretty impressed (but then again, that is not difficult). 😉 In the video, they are claiming 10x the oscillations per hour compared to a traditional balance system.  They also claim that the oscillator needs no lubrication (!) and replaces about 20 parts from a traditional watch.  I find myself wondering what the longevity and shock resistance of watches built around something like this will be.  Also, I wonder whether anyone other Frederique Constant will touch the tiny weights on the oscillator, which are apparently used to time the movement.  

I can't post a direct link to the video, but their marketing page with the video on it is here:

 

https://monochrome-watches.com/frederique-constant-slimline-monolithic-manufacture-video-review-technical-guide-specs-price/

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharring.

I hate to see moisture get to that oscilator. You reckon naphta and ultrasonic would do any good ?   

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very impressive !

Still mechanical, but instead of a quartz crystal+stepper-motor a high frequency vibrating disk, build out of one piece.

I wonder however the longevity? Material fatigue and endurance.

Would this fantastic, innovative, highly sophisticated movement last for decades? How many 1970's quartz watches, low and high end, do actually still work on their original movement?

Then again, we mortals also do have a certain lifespan, so perhaps who cares; just enjoy while you can 🤗

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1994 quartz Victorinox watch that is operating on its original movement.  I guess I sort of assumed it would run until the world supply of spare batteries ran out.  But I also assume that these quartz movements are so cheap that they get replaced rather than serviced.  Any insights about that? They have moving parts so they must wear out eventually . . .right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Often the PCB (printed circuit board) or the electronic components on them fail in time. 1994 isn't the '70's jet and undoubtedly there are still some 1970's quartz watches running, but the majority have given up their duty, ended up at the bottom of a drawer or found their way to landfill.

Also I was wondering about the company above; would it still exist in 50 years time and/or be able to supply the escapement disk for this particular watch?

Still, it's perhaps a step-stone for new developments, just like the '70's, 80's ground-breaking but long gone 5.25" 360Kb floppy, the 3.5" 1.44Mb disk and soon the CD/DVD were. Who knows ?

It's for sure a fine piece of technology 😉

 

Link to post
Share on other sites


×
×
  • Create New...