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Cleaning Solutions, UltraSonic and not

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I use denatured alcohol to clean the "shellacky" residue that forms on the inside of watch cleaners' jars and SS containers. It breaks down that stuff easily and visibly cleanly.

I don't think that I'd use it on pallet-forks or balances with roller tables/jewels installed. But regarding your basic dilution of isopropyl found in drugstores around the world, is it safe to use as quick rinse on complete balance assemblies? I ask because I just serviced a little 7.75L GP wrist-watch and it's running quite fast. I had noticed that the hairspring was sticking together a bit after soaking in Coleman fuel, what I believe is naptha. It seemed like there was  still a residue left behind.

So, would I be safe, and effectively remove the residue, by swirling the balance around in isopropyl for a bit after soaking in naptha? If there's any question, I'll just have go get some more One-Dip. I don't like the toxicity of it, or that it seems to disappear in a couple of years even if you have the cap on tightly. Any learned help is appreciated.

The problem with these small movements is that each time you manipulate things, you get close to disaster. And it's a game of numbers. Cheers.

 

Edited by MrRoundel

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Hello,

Wan't to start on my first pocket watch movement for a try out...

Planning on buying a Elma cleaning machine later this year, but for now I will do it manually.

Do I understand it right, that you put the parts in jars with 100% lighter fluid ( except pallets ) close the jar and put the jar in to the water in the ultrasonic? ( And then run as far as you can? :D )

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3 hours ago, Koen said:

 

 

 

Do I understand it right, that you put the parts in jars with 100% lighter fluid ( except pallets ) close the jar and put the jar in to the water in the ultrasonic? 

Lighter fluid is for lighters as it contains oils, fragrances and other stuff that does not belong to contemporary watchmaking. 

If you want the plates to shine give a first bath in ammonia based solution. 

Then a bath in petroleum ether (refined naphtha) to dissolve oils, check jewels for cleanliness under the loupe. 

Also useful is Isopropyl alcohol as final rinse and in some cases the only one. 

All these have been discussed many times previously in this same thread, which you can read for further education. 

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Thanks jdm.

 

I read this post, but on the end, I din't see it any more. English is not my normal language, and all different things were recommended.

 

I don't mean lighter fluid, in my country we call it "wasbenzine" let's say "cleaning fuel"... ;-)

 

But here I can find different products I can use, to many to choose off:

https://www.beco-technic.com/werkzeuge-verbrauchsartikel/reinigungsprodukte/fluessigkeiten-zum-reinigen/fuer-uhren.html

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Koen said:

I don't mean lighter fluid, in my country we call it "wasbenzine" let's say "cleaning fuel"... ;-)

Yes, refined benzine is petroleum ether, naptha, shellite, etc, but native English speakers will confuse it with benzene, and tell you that is toxic (true), so better avoid that term on an international forum. 

Edited by jdm

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9 minutes ago, Koen said:

Think I just going to order this machine and the right products:

As a beginner hobbyists you don't need an €2,000 automatic cleaning machine. The same and less money can be spent of important tools like timegrapher, bench case opener, water pressure tester, lubricants and even a lathe. You can get an economic jewelry ultrasound cleaner but event that isn't mandatory. 

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Hey jdm,

Thanks for your good advice.

Need to make some cost for my firm this year, so thats why I was thinking to buy it... And maybe later I make from my hobby a bit of an income, so good material is always a +. ;)

Also looking for this timegrapher:

https://www.beco-technic.com/geraete-maschinen/uhrenpruefgeraete-kontrollgeraete/geraete-zur-pruefung-von-uhren/witschi-watch-expert-pruefgeraet-fuer-mechanische-uhren.html

Maybe to much for a starter... but hey YOLO.

 

What watertester do you recommend? With water or vacuum?

https://www.beco-technic.com/geraete-maschinen/uhrenpruefgeraete-kontrollgeraete/geraete-zur-pruefung-der-wasserdichtheit.html

 

The ultrasonic cleaner I already have here... Use it for the jewelry of my wife. :D

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32 minutes ago, Koen said:

Need to make some cost for my firm this year, so thats why I was thinking to buy it... And maybe later I make from my hobby a bit of an income, so good material is always a +. ;)

If you have the funds buy a watchmaker lathe, accessories and learn how to use it. You may be become a good watchmaker as opposed to an equipped cleaner. 

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12 hours ago, Koen said:

Hello,

Wan't to start on my first pocket watch movement for a try out...

Planning on buying a Elma cleaning machine later this year, but for now I will do it manually.

Do I understand it right, that you put the parts in jars with 100% lighter fluid ( except pallets ) close the jar and put the jar in to the water in the ultrasonic? ( And then run as far as you can? :D )

Elma cleaning machine!!!?  NOT .   

I get me a staking set, set up a diy timegrapher ,lots of useful goodies you can get with that kind of money.

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Thank you all for the advice...

 

So no cleaning machine.:D

But still need to spend my budget for the end of the year... if not, government is taking it and spend it for me... :chainsaw:

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31 minutes ago, Koen said:

But still need to spend my budget for the end of the year... if not, government is taking it and spend it for me... :chainsaw:

That is so easy in watchmaking, especially when buying Swiss tools that on many cases  work the same but cost four times the Chinese. But that's another story. 

An other quick way to spend money is to buy  watches for practice. At the very first you can go cheap but ideally you want them to be of quality to be repairable, have parts available, and being of attractive brand and models to buyers to reseller later. 

However money can buy tools but not knowledge, dexterity and skllls, for that reason beginners must focus on practicing on the bench as more they can. Also reading books is very beneficial although nodawaday enrolling into an online course like the one offered by our Host Mark Lovick is probably a better alternative. 

Edited by jdm

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