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No part one was enough for me. 

Another video I watched of his after polishing the plates of a English Longcase clock he coats them in clear plastic. I don't care how long he has been repairing clocks going by his videos he is

This is my thoughts on this person. ???. I wonder what yours will be?  

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There is so much wrong in this video his rough handling of the clock is a disgrace, knocking the ends of the barrel arbors on a vice and pulling the springs out by hand gives exactly what you would expect a pair of coned springs and probably a nasty dent on the arbor ends. His choice of tools is extraordinary the largest pair of pliers in the tool box. I would be very surprised if this guy has never broken a pivot on a French clock the way he separates the plates and holds the movement.

 

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9 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

Did you watch part 2? I wonder how he got the springs into the barrels without any "machines".

No part one was enough for me. 

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Just watched the video ?and anyone who decides to take up watch or clock repair these videos can be there first port of call

and they rely on these people for what they saying or doing is the right way to work, and its not until they join a forum or go on a course

 they realise they have been doing it wrong ,myself included so its people like yourself oldhippy that can tell us how it should be done keep up the good work everyone its much appreciated

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Wow, did you see how 'coned' those mainsprings were when sitting on the bench by being pulled out like that!

I do hope those long nose pliers were not the serrated type, but I'm guessing they are.

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If anyone is looking for a good style of mainspring winder to remove the mainsprings correctly I recommend the Ollie Baker Style mainspring winder.

They are expensive, but if you do some digging you can find them for less than half what a lot of places sell them for.

The first mainspring he let down he did it so quickly I just thought it couldn't of had much more than half a turn on it, it wasn't until he let down the second one I saw the tool spinning in his hand.

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1 hour ago, Tmuir said:

If anyone is looking for a good style of mainspring winder to remove the mainsprings correctly I recommend the Ollie Baker Style mainspring winder.

They are expensive, but if you do some digging you can find them for less than half what a lot of places sell them for.

The first mainspring he let down he did it so quickly I just thought it couldn't of had much more than half a turn on it, it wasn't until he let down the second one I saw the tool spinning in his hand.

Hi Tmuir, is there a link to a good site or even a picture so I know what to look for? I've seen quite a few out there and the prices can vary so any guidance in the matter would be much appreciated.

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Here he is showing us his assortment of hammers and vises he has for repairing clocks. The last three hammers are OK but what the hell does he use the others for when he is clock repairing. Some of the vises are a bit OTT as well.

My question is what do you think he uses the large hammers for.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxXUqw1QhR4

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@RogerH

I just looked up the place I bought mine from but the website is gone, so I'm guessing they aren't selling them anymore.

You will probably be able to find one cheaper than on Cousin's website, but this is what it looks like.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/mainspring-winder-ollie-baker-style

This one is sold out but note it has the let down tool which you also need.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Ollie-Baker-Clock-Mainspring-Winder-with-Let-Down-Tool-and-Clamps-/271703776446

 

If you go look on YouTube there are plenty examples of it in use.

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6 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

Here he is showing us his assortment of hammers and vises he has for repairing clocks. The last three hammers are OK but what the hell does he use the others for when he is clock repairing. Some of the vises are a bit OTT as well.

My question is what do you think he uses the large hammers for.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxXUqw1QhR4

?

What does he use the sledge hammer for?

Maybe he works on tower clocks that the access to have been bricked up and he needs to knock a hole in the wall to get in.............

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17 minutes ago, Tmuir said:

@RogerH

I just looked up the place I bought mine from but the website is gone, so I'm guessing they aren't selling them anymore.

You will probably be able to find one cheaper than on Cousin's website, but this is what it looks like.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/mainspring-winder-ollie-baker-style

This one is sold out but note it has the let down tool which you also need.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Ollie-Baker-Clock-Mainspring-Winder-with-Let-Down-Tool-and-Clamps-/271703776446

 

If you go look on YouTube there are plenty examples of it in use.

Brilliant, many thanks.

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That was really uncomfortable to watch. 

My techniques is faster though, don't have to work about all of the fiddly disassembly:  take the movement out, hose it down with brake cleaner, let it dry, hose it down with WD-40, give it a shake, boom! You're done!

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13 hours ago, wls1971 said:

There is so much wrong in this video his rough handling of the clock is a disgrace

Yes I think the quote above sums it up quite nicely. Definitely not an enjoyable video to watch.

The problem we have here is an individual who is basically clueless. Fails to grasp the consequences of his actions and just how bad things could go especially with the mainspring. It's amazing what you can do in the world if you fail to grasp the bad stuff that can occur.

Then because I was really curious about the mainspring going back in its found at the link below. Amusingly he starts off talking about mainspring winders just when I thought he wasn't that clueless he does not disappoint. I'm not going to ruin the video for you Definitely something to watch if you want to ruin your day.

I wonder if he does all those mainsprings like this?

 

https://youtu.be/96XFEQgkyIY

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I find it really strange. I went to his website to further research his credentials. He is a 3rd generation clockmaker, qualified horologist with over 40 years of experience. His family business is over 100 yrs old. He has customers singing praises about his work. I have not found any negative comments.

Is it fair to judge him from a fews videos on YouTube. I would hold off passing judgment lest judgement be passed on me.

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3 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

I find it really strange. I went to his website to further research his credentials. He is a 3rd generation clockmaker, qualified horologist with over 40 years of experience. His family business is over 100 yrs old. He has customers singing praises about his work. I have not found any negative comments.

Is it fair to judge him from a fews videos on YouTube. I would hold off passing judgment lest judgement be passed on me.

If your putting your work up to public scrutiny you should ensure your methods are sound, I can only judge what he has presented as his work in the video, it is not good, I'm a learner I known some things I do are wrong or unsound but I endeavour to improve, I wince at the method he uses to remove the pins in the clock he rives them out with a pair of pliers that are far too large, I know that those plates will now be scratched on the edges, he bangs the barrel arbors on a metal vice to release the caps, I know the ends will now be dented, he tells people they do not need a mainspring winder and yanks them from the barrel he then puts them on the table and they are clearly out of shape, and coned.

He separates the plates holding the movement at an angle with no regard to the wheels and pivots.

Any criticism is of his own doing by presenting bad working practices as an example of his work and telling people this is how you do it what can he expect.

 

 

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Another video I watched of his after polishing the plates of a English Longcase clock he coats them in clear plastic.

I don't care how long he has been repairing clocks going by his videos he is a menace to horology.  

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