Jump to content

Rebushing a Forestville escapement platform


Recommended Posts

I posted about repairing the cracked mainspring barrels of tbis clock last year. The clock worked fine for a few months but it stopped completely a couple of weeks ago. There was totally no power transferred to the balance wheel. I removed the balance and found that the pallet fork would not unlock anymore. On examining the escapement, I found that the pivot holes of the escape wheel are worn.

I haven't done any rebushing work before. I can't even tell if this hole is original or has been rebushed before. The hole on one of the plates is in a very narrow strip of brass. I'm wondering if it is even possible to rebush this hole.

I hope more experienced members can take a look at the photos and advise me. Thanks.20210221_205337.thumb.jpg.870a178224b34cd4c2d899a830ebc950.jpg

20210221_205255.thumb.jpg.8d71b5a5b62cbc5c4ad81d997510c00b.jpg

20210221_205315.thumb.jpg.b0092cf827987c5b6beb3b7efd26dd9b.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hector   Both holes look original and dont appear to have been bushed.  The method in doing these is the same as any re bushing job, making sure you broach or drill the hole central. the attaced noted will explain the procedure.  I use a small drill in the drill press drilled under size (bush Size) and breach to fit thn broach the pivot hole.  when done try the wheel and the adjacent one for smooth running. 

1002416176_BushingUsingHandTools.pdf (2).pdf

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good for a first attempt, always check for end shake and make sure the wheels run free, it's a good idea when all is done to put the wheels between the plates  and tighten then check on the running as I said to make sure they run free try it at different angles and if all is well that will be a good job done. 

If you have a clock movement with lantern pinions that is this type the holes for the wheels are meant to have a loose fitting. That is this type.

 

images.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The first clock that I serviced had lantern pinions. I learned how to repin a lantern pinion from watching YouTube. 😬

I drilled out the oil sinks this morning. I'll test the escape wheel on its own first before fitting the pallet fork and balance wheel when I get home from work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I reamed the hole for the bush with my five sided cutting broach, it raised a bur around the edges of the hole. Is that normal or is it because the broach is blunt or am I using too much force?

My Seitz jewelling set also has D shaped broaches. Can they be used for bushing or is the taper angle wrong?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bur around the edge is normal a simple way of removing it if you don't have the right tools is a simple pen knife blade. A D shaped broach is OK providing you have the correct size. Lantern pinions can be fun to replace and it's so easy. I have seen some nasty work done on them, instead of closing the hole with a punch they have run soft solder around, so if just one pinion needs replacing you have a task on your hands. 

The one on the left is the sort of tool to get hold of for removing bur you can get all different sizes 

%24_57__74011.1511507788.1280.1280.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hector  Nice job  To remove the burr and create an oil sink I personaly use a drill bit in a pin vice for more control the same applies to the burrs posted by Old Hippy best used manually on delicate jobs.  Ok in the dremel for milling etc.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The clock has been running overnight. Thanks everyone. 

I now understand what OH means by soft modern brass. The brass of the bush is much harder than the brass of the plate. When I was reaming the hole, I could feel the broach biting into the brass, but with the bush, I had to use a little more force to cut into it.

If I get bushing rods from Cousins, is the brass soft modern brass or hard vintage brass?

I could hardly see the taper on the pre-manufactured bushes. What is the taper on a typical bush?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always used bushing rods as I prefered to make my own bushings. I had no trouble with the hardness of the brass, I am talking back in the 70's and 80's there was a lot of stock already in the workshop. Buying replacement from my supplier which was Southern Watch & Clock Suppliers from  Orpington Kent sorry to say they no longer exist.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2021 at 1:21 AM, HectorLooi said:

If I get bushing rods from Cousins, is the brass soft modern brass or hard vintage brass?

This is a very good question. Cousins may state where it is from. Personally, I would not use it if it isn’t European or USA-made. 
 

I have made bushings from scrap antique clock movement pillars in the past. Partly to get the colour correct for antique movements, but also to ensure good quality brass. 
 

I also have a set of Bergeon pre-made bushes which can obviously be adjusted to fit. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Good day! i have choice to buy this legendary watch in exactly my favorite condition: 1.) unserviced  2.) untested  I wouldn’t mind there is no evidence if barometric module works, but what I mind is, I can’t find any technical information of how this module looks and works.  I like to get challenging new movements and also don’t want to crops the line of spoiling something.  Does any of you, kind souls have any literature or link or photo or even oil painting of this module? The watch is referred as 53223. Cheers! Jakub 
    • We haven't or at least I haven't entirely forgotten? The problem is I've seen this somewhere? We've discussed sleeves before I don't know if we covered ones for wristwatches probably have but I've seen one of these before I just need to remember where the reference was that I saw it once I remember I can find that and I'll attach it. Then the reason why we not getting copious quantity of answers is because if you notice anything related to American watches in particular earlier watches especially anything involved with casing and sleeves there aren't that many people on this group that work with those. Plus I was hoping for a better name inside the case. Because of you go to an offbrand it's going make it a lot harder and getting a sleeve to replace that anyway is going to be much much harder so as soon as I can remember where I saw the reference to this?
    • I am working on this thing.  It needs a new hairspring--I am searching. But what I wanted to mention here refers to the design of this movement.  Notice that one large plate that wraps around one side of the movement.  It is a real bear to get it installed given that one of the wheels is buried underneath and difficult to position while trying to manage the escape wheel. The later 6/0 Walthams (e.g., the 6/0-D which I have) splits this plate into two pieces. I am a neophyte and as such, have not seen a vast number of movements.  Maybe stuff like this is common.
    • Perhaps back to basic school lessons may be the answer.  🤔 Put some iron fillings on a piece of thin paper and put this on something plastic that you can hold over the item being checked. Moving it about should see a pattern in the iron filings develop.  If none then no magnetism in item?
×
×
  • Create New...