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Does this Movado Auto Chrono Have a Snap-Back?


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Is anyone familiar with this Movado 88-93-890 v91 case? I rarely work on snap-back cased watches and I was to be sure it isn't removed through the crystal side before I attempt to remove the movement. If it is a snap-back, it's really on there. If it comes out the dial side, anyone have any tips? Thanks in advance.

movado caseback reduced.jpg

movado face side reduced.jpg

movado side reduced.jpg

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26 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Interesting! This is the first time I've heard about this tool. I assume it must be this this tool? How is it used? Do you simply place the blade between the case and the case back and then press the top part (button) to activate the internal hammer? Is the flat side of the bade held against the case (I would assume so) or the case back?

Hi VWatchie you have 3 blades to chose from, you place the blade into the snap back slot provided and push the main body into the Watch and pop goes the weasel, I mean caseback. You can also adjust the strength of the pressure applied by turning the top of body clockwise or anti clockwise. I have mine on the weakest setting as they have a lot of power on the strongest setting and I have damaged a case. But they are very good at what they are deigned for. They have a strong spring inside the main body and when pressed against the surface it goes to a certain point then bingo. 

Hope this helps https://youtu.be/viVpyuEo0dM

Graziano 

Edited by Graziano
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Nice.

I've used center punches that have a similar mechanism, just push instead of banging a hammer. I've been looking for a better opener, I think I'll try this one.

Thanks!

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On 2/7/2021 at 3:29 AM, jdm said:

Seems to me that is a reguar snap back case, no front loader.

Thanks, jdm, I feel a bit better about it now. I've just never seen a caseback jammed on so tight. Under the microscope, I can see rust where the caseback and the case must come together so I'm soaking it in penetrating oil just deep enough to cover the joint while I wait for a new shock tool from Cousins. Hope it has the guts to get the job done.

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11 hours ago, bangy55 said:

 I can see rust where the caseback and the case must come together so I'm soaking it in penetrating oil just deep enough to cover the joint while I wait for a new shock tool from Cousins. Hope it has the guts to get the job done.

I've never tried a shock tool, I'm not even convinced that's the best approach. For sturdy cases I use a lever type covered below, but if not careful may lease some markings, so it's always good to coat in plastic.

 

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Update...

What a marvelous little tool. I was shocked by the "Shock Tool." The very first attempt literally blasted the caseback off and across my bench. I had been soaking the watch in an 1/8" pool of CLP while waiting for the arrival of the $120 or so tool from Cousins. As you can see, there is a layer of it on everything in the case. Sucker was rusted tight. It'll never be a waterproof watch again, but there is no damage beyond where the case and its back met. Happy camper. I can certainly recommend it to you, jdm. Cheers.

rusted shut.JPG

shock tool.JPG

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2 hours ago, bangy55 said:

What a marvelous little tool. I was shocked by the "Shock Tool."

Interesting! This is the first time I've heard about this tool. I assume it must be this this tool? How is it used? Do you simply place the blade between the case and the case back and then press the top part (button) to activate the internal hammer? Is the flat side of the bade held against the case (I would assume so) or the case back?

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11 hours ago, dadistic said:

Nice.

I've used center punches that have a similar mechanism, just push instead of banging a hammer. I've been looking for a better opener, I think I'll try this one.

Thanks!

That's exactly what it's like, only on steroids!

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20 hours ago, VWatchie said:

Interesting! This is the first time I've heard about this tool. I assume it must be this this tool? How is it used? Do you simply place the blade between the case and the case back and then press the top part (button) to activate the internal hammer? Is the flat side of the bade held against the case (I would assume so) or the case back?

Graziano explained it perfectly. It reminds me of the old impact wrench you'd hit with a hammer and it would turn the screw driver blade while forcing it into the screw slot. Only with the hammer built in. Very powerful.

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