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To polish or not to polish


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Hi there, just wondering what everyones thoughts are on polishing your watch collections. Yesterday I pick up this nicely working grade 1 1908 Waltham pocket watch. And the first thing I did was polish by hand the nickel silver case to see the condition of it. I use menzerna universal cream on all of my collection. Gold plated, gold filled, silver what ever. Even if some plating has worn off they still turn out nice and shiny. Do you guys and gal's polish your collection? 

Cheers Graziano 

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Edited by Graziano
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Looks really nice ☺️👍. I polish my cases and acrylic crystals with autosol metal polish which does a great job. For brass and nickel cases I apply a coat of lacquer otherwise they tarnish.

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Yep. With Simichrome. It's what I use to polish injection mold and punch press dies with. Works great.

There are some though, depending on age and model, that I don't for obvious reasons.  Just want to leave "the look," ya know?

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1 hour ago, MechanicMike said:

Yep. With Simichrome. It's what I use to polish injection mold and punch press dies with. Works great.

There are some though, depending on age and model, that I don't for obvious reasons.  Just want to leave "the look," ya know?

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Hello, which ones don't you polish just out of interest have you got a photo? I have this Admam Burdess 1888 made fusee that was filthy so I serviced it and polished everything in and out of the Watch. 

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Nothing special-sometimes I just like the look of a well worn, almost satin-like finish of an old pocketwatch.  Just a personal preference.  The Hamilton was my grandfather's. 

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