Jump to content
  • 0

Landeron 148 chronograph feature only starting and resetting, no pausing


Question

Beginner horologist here. I attempted to overhaul my first chronograph. I followed the manual from cousins to the tee from what I can tell, and everything is working great EXCEPT the chronograph will only start, and when I hit the bottom button to pause, it automatically resets to zero instead of pausing before a second click to reset. What would cause this? I've been scratching my head since it essentially works perfectly otherwise. Any help would be great appreciated!

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

It might be nice if you gave us a picture looking straight down at the chronograph with as much detail as you can.

One of the minor problems with the chronographs are and it's mentioned in the manual not all screws are screws. Some of the screws are for adjusting things and if you rotate them without knowing what you're doing that would be bad.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Yes, a pic would help. The flyback lever can need some adjusting on these, they are usually filed a bit. But even if it needs filing it wouldn't cause this problem- it usually means it "blocks" when trying to stop the chrono.

 

What can happen that would cause your issue is the cam (called mounted hammer in the tech sheet) doesn't advance fully when the chrono is started. In this case the flyback lever will interact with it as though it's in stop position- but the cam has advanced just enough to engage the coupling clutch and lift the brake*.

 

A photo in the run position would help see this. Also, if you are accustomed to other (most) chronographs these work differently, usually the button at 2 o'clock  start/stop, at 4 o'clock zeros. On this one the 2 o'clock starts, 4 stops, 2 starts again if wanted, or hit 4 two times to stop then zero.

 

Here's a link to Cousins tech manuals on the Landeron chronos, which will help with nomenclature and servicing.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/document/category/landeron-movement-parts

 

*on edit- forgot these don't have a brake.

Edited by nickelsilver
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Just a thought, do you not press the top pusher to start, pause, and restart and the bottom button to just reset to zero. I may be wrong,

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
5 hours ago, nickelsilver said:

Yes, a pic would help. The flyback lever can need some adjusting on these, they are usually filed a bit. But even if it needs filing it wouldn't cause this problem- it usually means it "blocks" when trying to stop the chrono.

 

What can happen that would cause your issue is the cam (called mounted hammer in the tech sheet) doesn't advance fully when the chrono is started. In this case the flyback lever will interact with it as though it's in stop position- but the cam has advance just enough to engage the coupling clutch and lift the brake.

 

A photo in the run position would help see this. Also, if you are accustomed to other (most) chronographs these work differently, usually the button at 2 o'clock  start/stop, at 4 o'clock zeros. On this one the 2 o'clock starts, 4 stops, 2 starts, again if wanted, or hit 4 to times to stop then zero.

 

Here's a link to Cousins tech manuals on the Landeron chronos, which will help with nomenclature and servicing.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/document/category/landeron-movement-parts

 

7 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

It might be nice if you gave us a picture looking straight down at the chronograph with as much detail as you can.

One of the minor problems with the chronographs are and it's mentioned in the manual not all screws are screws. Some of the screws are for adjusting things and if you rotate them without knowing what you're doing that would be bad.

Sure thing, here's a photo of the chrono running and stopped. I've put in a video too showing the start/reset

PXL_20210120_162218623.jpg

PXL_20210120_162242047.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Ok, it's not going all the way to the run position. The mounted hammer (cam) should be lifting one step higher. That is the stop position, so the eccentrics have been played with in the past. In the pic eccentric 1 adjusts how deep the coupling clutch engages with the chronograph runner. This is out of play in the stop position. Eccentric 2 adjusts how far the mounted hammer lifts the coupling clutch when it stops the chrono. This will definitely need adjustment. 3 adjusts the lifting of the sliding gear when it is zeroed, and 4 adjusts the depth of the sliding gear when the chrono is running.

 

What you need to figure out first of all is why it isn't going all the way to the run position. These aren't the best chronos (but they're good)- they count on a button push to start to be forceful enough to jump the mounted hammer to run position; either something is blocking the pusher, or the operating lever, or less likely the mounted hammer itself.

 

 

landeron 148.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
8 hours ago, nickelsilver said:

Ok, it's not going all the way to the run position. The mounted hammer (cam) should be lifting one step higher. That is the stop position, so the eccentrics have been played with in the past. In the pic eccentric 1 adjusts how deep the coupling clutch engages with the chronograph runner. This is out of play in the stop position. Eccentric 2 adjusts how far the mounted hammer lifts the coupling clutch when it stops the chrono. This will definitely need adjustment. 3 adjusts the lifting of the sliding gear when it is zeroed, and 4 adjusts the depth of the sliding gear when the chrono is running.

 

What you need to figure out first of all is why it isn't going all the way to the run position. These aren't the best chronos (but they're good)- they count on a button push to start to be forceful enough to jump the mounted hammer to run position; either something is blocking the pusher, or the operating lever, or less likely the mounted hammer itself.

 

 

landeron 148.jpg

This is incredibly helpful thank you so much! Will mess around with it and see what I can do!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 1/20/2021 at 9:48 AM, nickelsilver said:

Ok, it's not going all the way to the run position. The mounted hammer (cam) should be lifting one step higher. That is the stop position, so the eccentrics have been played with in the past. In the pic eccentric 1 adjusts how deep the coupling clutch engages with the chronograph runner. This is out of play in the stop position. Eccentric 2 adjusts how far the mounted hammer lifts the coupling clutch when it stops the chrono. This will definitely need adjustment. 3 adjusts the lifting of the sliding gear when it is zeroed, and 4 adjusts the depth of the sliding gear when the chrono is running.

 

What you need to figure out first of all is why it isn't going all the way to the run position. These aren't the best chronos (but they're good)- they count on a button push to start to be forceful enough to jump the mounted hammer to run position; either something is blocking the pusher, or the operating lever, or less likely the mounted hammer itself.

 

 

landeron 148.jpg

 

On 1/20/2021 at 1:31 AM, JohnR725 said:

It might be nice if you gave us a picture looking straight down at the chronograph with as much detail as you can.

One of the minor problems with the chronographs are and it's mentioned in the manual not all screws are screws. Some of the screws are for adjusting things and if you rotate them without knowing what you're doing that would be bad.

Here's an update! After many hours of fiddling and frustration I discovered that the reverser spring was slightly warped, this was preventing the hammer from functioning properly. I replaced the part and now it's running!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Similar Content

    • By evese
      Hi all, hope your having a good day!

      I have finally got back to restoring a Landeron movement, a personal project I started a while back. I believe it is an early cal. 48 although it may be a 47? The balance was one of the many issues with the watch. With a broken pivot on the staff and the balance spring beyond fixing, without buying professional tools finding a complete balance would be the easiest way for me to fix the issue.

      I am at a complete loss as to what balance I need; I know its a non-incabloc, possibly made by either Barbell or Renata but I'm not sure what I should be looking for, or where to find one. There are many variants and I'm not sure if any of the calibers of Landeron house the same balance that I might be able to utilise?  

      I've attached a picture of the movement before I disassembled if it's to any use? Any help is very much appreciated!

      Many thanks 

    • By grh215
      Hello everyone. I have a really sad story and I am a complete amateur. I am a machinist for a living so I thought I would give a crack at making a frankenwatch, however it did not go as planned and now I have a movement with subdials that don’t work and a whole lot of parts and money invested and I don’t know what to do. I need the help of a professional. The donor movement was a NOS, new old stock, and was running perfectly, however I messed up almost everything attempting to make this watch. I will happily ship all of the parts needed to complete this watch and pay for any repair that need to be made and for the return shipping. I need the help of a professional how can repair and assemble the watch with the parts and return it to me. I will pay for everything, the labor, replacement parts, return shipping, I just need someone’s help. 
      Details about the project: 
      movement: valjoux 7733
      dial: vintage NOS angelus chronograph dial
      case: custom machined case 
      crystal: plexiglass




    • By IOB
      I have a UG Tri-Compax from the 1950s or 60s (Calibre 281): The chronograph (centre) seconds hand can’t turn past 58.5 seconds and the whole watch stops ticking/working (nothing moving/turning in the movement). However, when the reset pusher (4 o’clock) is kept pressed, it enables the seconds hand and watch to move/tick again. The reset pusher is released when the chrono seconds hand reaches 60: the watch resumes ticking and the hands move until the chrono seconds hand reaches 58.5s again. The process is repeated.
       
      It has been noticed that if the watch is held face down then the reset pusher “procedure” doesn’t always work (i.e. the watch does not resume ticking/moving). It’s usually necessary to turn the watch over and try to press the pusher a few times in order to make the seconds hands move again.
       
      The 30-minute sub-dial at 3 o’clock has stopped working, too.
       
      If the chrono is not activated, then the watch seems to run properly.
       
      What do you think is the problem?
       
      Thanks for your insight!
    • By Usluyan
      Hello, everybody.
      I wanted to share my restoration stories that I have done for a long time and thrown into my archive. First I discussed the Atomic Mars 71 Brand using Valjoux 7734.
       
      As it was seen, scratch and dial is broken. To begin with, I tried to brush the Case as Brushed and make it the first day. If it is decorated, I polished and re-painted the indexes (with acrylic paint). I usually do this in three layers so that the paint is not deleted in a short time.
      I replaced the case buttons and tubes with aftermarket buttons.
      Since the condition of the dial was in very poor condition, I had it re-painted. The quality is not so good. In Turkey, unfortunately, not doing the job well.
      Caliber 7734 (Valjoux) is a special and robust mechanism for me. With good maintenance and lubrication, you can reduce deflection values up to 3-4 seconds per day. I added a short timelapse video about it :)
      As a result, such a result came before us.
      Thank you
      Taskin
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKH6yTKUfpM
       









    • By jackie01
      Hello guys,
      I want to show you my lately restoration project. This time it was a Seiko 7015-8000 with blue dial. Watch came to me in very poor condition. As you can see on photos the case was scratchty, crystal was totaly tarnished with deep scratches. Everywhere was dirt, gunk and mud...yuck. Movement was running and stopping with very low amplitude. After opened the caseback I wasn't suprised - it looked like as case - dirt and signs of wear. Rotor was loose and fall out the case. When I take off the crystall I saw dial which had faded Seiko logo, some scratches and hands which lost their lume.
       














       
      Next step was strip down the movement - everywhere dirt and dry old oil. Time to cleaning bath

       







       
      Look at this - it's my temporary balance wheel stand - I suspect that from temporary it will be permanent. It does job well.
       

       
      After cleaning it's time to assembly movement. Now it looks better - maybe not pristine but clean and shiny. New oil here and there and movement starts to run. Now it's time for bench testing before install it to the case.
       





       
       
      Meanwhile I took care of the case, dial and hands. Case got some polishing work - not to much cause I didn't want to loose the sharpness of edges. That is effect:
       





      Dial and hands got new lume - I am not perfect in this work but I still learn to do this. Additional the seconds hand was repainted to orange color. I didn't change the crystall but i just polished it with waterpaper and on the end polish paste. Effect suprissed me. Time for the  pleasant work - putting this all pieces together into the watch.
       







       

      VID_20190927_195610.mp4
       
  • Recently Browsing

  • Topics

  • Posts

×
×
  • Create New...