Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Evening I thought I'd share my modest attic fresh finds less the nasty wrist bands. I bought them mainly for the Sekonda. Both not working, the Sekonda's balance was wrapped round it's rotor.

But the Timex really surprised me as it started to work as I adjusted the time. Stopped a bit, and after a bit of shaking and a gentle warming on a radiator I've got it to go. Though it does , run a little slow. The self winding side of it seems to work, however when I go to wind it manually it the crown winds back when you let go.  I guess this might be something to do with the click not engaging. 

loft_fresh.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Bearman said:

Evening I thought I'd share my modest attic fresh finds less the nasty wrist bands. I bought them mainly for the Sekonda. Both not working, the Sekonda's balance was wrapped round it's rotor.

But the Timex really surprised me as it started to work as I adjusted the time. Stopped a bit, and after a bit of shaking and a gentle warming on a radiator I've got it to go. Though it does , run a little slow. The self winding side of it seems to work, however when I go to wind it manually it the crown winds back when you let go.  I guess this might be something to do with the click not engaging. 

loft_fresh.jpg

Take a look at this "sophisticated" click 🙂

 

Click - Copy.PNG

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks watchweasol. I've had another look and it says the following at the bottom of the dial:

Great Britain "46562 10878"

JerseyMo, the plucky little watch isn't done yet. The auto-winding is definitely working. I've been checking in on it periodically and giving it a shake. It's ticking away as it should and the date advances, even if it's running about 12-15 mins slow over roughly a 12 hour period. I've warmed to it for sure. The bean counters can't mark this one off their spreadsheet just yet.

Hello again Poljot. Is the "sophisticated" click just a piece of bent metal engaging the teeth? I think I'll have to investigate further and report back, after I've cleaned the DNA and grime from around the case back before I open it!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks watchweasol that's fantastic. I've had a quick scan through, it's always good to have a manual. You don't happen to have the 104 manual it refers to for cleaning?

Off now to read and digest, thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again. They explain the process pretty well and are a great help. Took the back off the watch tonight for a quick look and thanks to the manuals confirming, I need to get my hands on a crystal lift tool before I go any further. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bearman said:

Thanks again. They explain the process pretty well and are a great help. Took the back off the watch tonight for a quick look and thanks to the manuals confirming, I need to get my hands on a crystal lift tool before I go any further. 

Do not get fooled  by simplicity of movement's agricultural look. Depending on how far you go with taking it apart, you may find soon that servicing Timex movements could be a royal pain, or simply irritating. Trying to fit all the wheels at once while holding two plates - can be challenging. Hairspring Wedge Pin - is also a "gift" from Timex, and so are V-conic bearings, and the balance screw. Good luck, but remember that preferred method of servicing such movements was Repair by Replacement with Timex refurbished movement.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi If you can dismantle a Timex and put it back together again and make it tick a conventional watch should be straight forward. Consider this as your apprenticeship.    all the best an good luck.  just be patient.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Hi If you can dismantle a Timex and put it back together again and make it tick a conventional watch should be straight forward. Consider this as your apprenticeship.    all the best an good luck.  just be patient.

I am with weasol, when you see a non running timex, run and fast.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouragement everyone. I've nothing to lose by investigating further, I'm in no rush and plan to take my time and it'll be another learning curve for sure. I've another project on the go at the moment, and I should really finish that first before embarking on the next challenge.

I saw the bit about the hairspring wedge, they make it sound so simple in the manual, I'm sure it's not......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi like I said before just take your time and don't get frustrated, because putting a Timex back together can be frustrating. Lining up all the wheels and dropping on the plate. Pinning the spring will be a bit daunting first time around but gets easier with practice.     all the best

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Timexes! It must have desiged to be an insult to the Swiss watch industry.

It's a real paradox. It's so simple yet so complicated. Anyone who is trained as a watchmaker would find them frustrating. 

Some are really ugly, some are simply elegant. Just look at their dials. Even after 50 years, some still look as good as the day it left the factory. And they are all held on by 4 metal tabs folded over the bottom plate.

Many of them have really taken a beating but just keep on ticking.

They may look like crap on a timegrapher but would still keep good time.

They are just great fun.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Poljot said:

Hey Poljot are they sapphire crystals? 

I agree don't get me wrong I'm just throwing in a bit of humour at my expense. But thanks for the link to the crystals 😃

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Graziano said:

Hey Poljot are they sapphire crystals? 

I agree don't get me wrong I'm just throwing in a bit of humour at my expense. But thanks for the link to the crystals 😃

Definitely, custom made, just for your Timex and my Omega. I also keep one for MechanicMike You see how clear it is!

IMG_9429 - Copy.jpg

Edited by Poljot
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Good evening. I thought I just give you a little update as you were kind enough to share your wisdom. I had a interlude from Project Sekonda to look at the Timex as curiosity got the better of me.

JerseyMo, you were spot on with your diagnosis, yes indeed the click was worn. On close inspection there's a groove worn right into the click by the ratchet teeth. Is there a way to repair this or is it a case of looking for donor in the hope it's got a less worn click?

Many thanks again

Link to post
Share on other sites

an NOS replacement click is the best solution.  These are not so easy to come by so the next best is to find a donor.  You can find them on many Timex movements from the late 1970's thru 1990's. models would be in the 100 range. 104,105,107, and so on.  I know some have tried to bend down the portion of the tip on the old click to get it to catch the ratchet gear.  But, this is more of a temp fix and likely not to last very long.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I have a Factory new old stock Pallet fork complete.  So the entire fork is new.  When it is running, it remains running in all positions and only varies +- 4 seconds.  It runs at 0s in DU and DD, and +-4 seconds from 0s in PU PD PR PL.  Once it is running, it stays running.  The pallet fork had some excess shellac on the tip of one of the stones, but I cleaned that off with a bit of alcohol and and a small foam paint brush (being careful not to get any alcohol on the shellac holding the stones in place) That did not change anything.   Its a double roller so it is hard to see the guard pin.  I will check for clearance.  Both the upper and lower escape wheel jewels are perfectly round, and the pivots on the escape wheel are in good shape. No pock marks and not bent.  The upper and lower pivot jewels for the pallet fork are also in great shape. Perfectly round. Neither have any pronounced side shake.  The pivots on the NOS fork are shiny and new.  (I have a Spencer A/O stereo microsocpe) I am a bit worried that I may need to reposition the pallet stones and it is possible that they are over locking enough to keep it from staring, but not enough to stop it from running.     I will try to get some pics of the lock and drop.  
    • The watch looks great. I love the typeface for the indices! Floor looks pretty good too!
    • A small but mighty achievement. Well done and thanks for sharing.
    • Excellent project and I am looking forward to furthers posts.
    • It's a mix of equipment and technique. For getting a finish free of microscratches on stainless steel, I use loose 4" cotton wheels and the Menzerna family of compounds. I step down from blue (if needed) to pink to yellow to white. In between each step, clean the case with a steamer or an ultrasonic cleaner. You can get true mirror polishing, with no swirls or scratches under a 10x loupe and raking light, this way. An underappreciated side of this level of polishing is contamination. Different grits shouldn't be used on the same wheel, or course, but think also about your fingers, how the piece is cleaned and wiped down, and so on. A fine finish will be scratched if a piece is wiped or dried with something that has old compound residue on it.    
×
×
  • Create New...