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Several years ago, I dug this out of my dad's box-o-watches.  Further research indicated it is somewhat rare. The battery that it used is no longer available--it is shaped like a flying saucer with lines to fit the case back.  Needless to say, no modern battery would fit this profile.  Fortunately, 1.5 volts is the battery voltage required and others had already discovered that a 389 was the correct thickness.  Someone in the UK had produced some spacers that would fit in the case back and hold the 389.  I tried to contact him...to no avail.  Undaunted, I designed a spacer and printed it with my 3D printer.  Voila!  Works great.  The pictures are of the watch and the spacer as illustrated in the 3D CAD tool.

2021-01-13 18_04_02-Photos.png

2021-01-13 18_05_00-FreeCAD 0.18.png

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    • Not all mainsprings are coated some of them supposedly because of the alloy they don't need Teflon or anything. But you still caught with the same problem basically it's invisible. If you clean the mainspring and it had an invisible lubrication it now does not. The problem with invisible lubrication is you don't know it's there. Which means if you clean it you remove it but since you don't know if it's there or not that doesn't matter. If the mainspring has old oils are greases they definitely have to come off because they will be sticky. if you have a nice clean mainspring it should be lubricated with something. Just don't get carried away with putting too much on otherwise it leaks out of the barrel.
    • Thanks again. They explain the process pretty well and are a great help. Took the back off the watch tonight for a quick look and thanks to the manuals confirming, I need to get my hands on a crystal lift tool before I go any further. 
    • A question that comes up all too often is problems related to hairsprings. Seems like a simple solution the hairspring is removable they can be swapped. But you're going to end up with timing issues each hairspring comes with its balance wheel it's why they're not sold a separate components they come together. I'm attaching a PDF it's not for your watch I want you to go to the very last page. The very bottom of the last page look at how they hairspring looks? Compare that with your hairspring they don't quite look the same. I don't think your hair Springs been destroyed I think it can be fixed but it can't be fixed if you don't grasp what it's supposed to look like. Then even if you grasp what it's supposed to look like hairspring work requires a lot of time to learn. Like everything else in watch repair it requires a heck of a lot of practice. You really should be practicing bending hairsprings every single day preferably not in a watch something disposable. Look on eBay look for cheap movements  Something a don't care about something to practice with because without the practice trying to practice as you go on the watches are working on is not a recipe for success. The reason for the PDF is the last page talks about the etachron system which adds complications perhaps. So the problem is at least for me it's hard to tell where the problem is with your hairspring other than the problem is very visible.  This is because it could be a bend of the hairspring or if the etachron  stud for instance has been rotated and you're not quite the right place that is not be a problem also. Or more likely you have both problems. Seiko 7S26C_36C.pdf
    • Buttoned back up and ticking away nicely. I wonder how many of these are still running? Some Metamec history.  
    • Right. Moebius 8200 is a good option.
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