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Has anyone here had experience with Omega Factory servicing.  I've sent a watch for service to them and they want to replace the dial due to "lacquer coming off the back of the dial".  Not a fix, but a replace at 1 1/2 times the cost of the service!  Anyone else have a story on this topic?

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My personal advice: get it back and have it serviced by an honest, reputable, independent watchmaker. It will cost less and you will have not to hear nonsense.

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50 minutes ago, hourtime said:

Has anyone here had experience with Omega Factory servicing.  I've sent a watch for service to them and they want to replace the dial due to "lacquer coming off the back of the dial".  Not a fix, but a replace at 1 1/2 times the cost of the service!  Anyone else have a story on this topic?

If you do not mind, I will print and frame your message and hang it on the wall as a reminder / warning.

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When watches are returned to the factory for service , what you get is a complete over haul which means any /all suspect parts are changed as in your case also the dial. The lacquer flaking off if left could stop the movement within weeks or months of the service  and then you would not be a happy bunny sending it back again at your cost. They are just covering their backs.  A local watchmaker would likely seal the lacquer during the overhaul.  The costs are probably proportionate with the cost of a replacement watch and can be quite pricey.  I had a Seamaster done in the early seventies it cost £50 +  The average wage then was £18 to£20 a week.   As jdm remarked get it back and serviced locally the BHI would supply you with a list of reputable watchmakers capable of doing the job

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I recently had a cal 565 omega in for service. The client told me he had taken it in to a jeweler who is also the omega agent for the area about 5 years ago. He told me they had sent it away to one of the 2 the official Omega appointed service centres in the country for servicing. He said he found out about me from a mutual friend and wanted it serviced and checked over. I told him this watch looks familiar could he wait 5 minutes. On opening the back and checking the serial no against my records we found out that I had actually done the service for the jeweller at about 10X's less than he was charged. Just goes to show.

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If you look online they do list their prices. But they used to have a price list that had more information and I'm guessing your watch might actually be considered vintage. Vintage will change the price of everything.

When factory does a service has pointed out above by watchweasol They usually replace anything they don't like. I have a friend with a coaxial that needed servicing and they threw in the dial and hands at the same price as the servicing because they didn't think they could clean it because of condensation damage basically. Although they may have been being generous because when he took it in for servicing they had a boutique. Then there was peaceful protesting which destroyed downtown Seattle including the boutique. The service center is still there because it was much farther in the building it was protected from the peaceful protesters the boutique was not. When they finished the watch they called him up and said their shipping it overnight FedEx I believe because the boutique has relocated to California. But the service center will stay here it's just going to relocate to a new building.

 

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I have had in the past mixed experiences with Omega I sent a 1980's 18ct gold constellation for a service in the late 1980's the watch had been worn a lot and required a service, case and bracelet refurbishment, they made a really first rate job of the watch and it came back looking like it had just come out of a jewelers window, the cost at the time was £130.00 which considering the work done was very reasonable. I then bought a brand new Omega Speedmaster Professional in 1991 at a cost of £595.00 (those where days when Omega where good value) from new the watch would stop when not worn at night even though fully wound, so I sent it back under warranty. The watch arrived back in quite a state the dial had been scratched and the chronograph would not function correctly the large seconds hand would jump backwards when the start button was pressed and would not always reset to zero, so again it went back under warranty and came back no better, I had to kick up a fuss in the end and the watch was replaced under warranty.

I have had mixed results from other companies services centers as well Jaeger Lecoultre sent a Atmos clock back from service with two bolts missing from the motor unit the part that holds the gas bellows and the cover over the bellows was not seated correctly it cost me £450.00 and a six month wait for that service,  after complaining they sent me the bolts through the post and I fitted them my self.

By far the best service I received was from Rolex I sent a Submariner in for a service many years back the turn around was 3 weeks and the watch came back like new at the time I sent it back it cost £260.00 for the service.

 

 

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To be more specific, the piece is 8 yrs old, (Planet Ocean Dive watch) going for it's first service.  They want to replace the dial at $750 US!!!, rather than perform a simple lacquer repair, that is what seems so absurd.  They say the watch shows signs of shock, which I would say looks more like everyday wear on a daily worn watch.  Regardless.....how would it be possible for "shock" to cause a lacquer problem on the back of the dial.  I cannot imagine trying to re-create that situation in a new piece, even by abusing it.   Has anyone heard of lacquer "defects" in Omega in the last 10 yrs?

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14 minutes ago, hourtime said:

To be more specific, the piece is 8 yrs old, (Planet Ocean Dive watch) going for it's first service.  They want to replace the dial at $750 US!!!

Plain and simple upselling, without any justification. Your watch dials are available (to the manufacturer and service centers only) but produce no profit while sitting on a shelf. Bring your business somewhere else or wait a little longer for servicing the watch, nothing bad will happen, I promise you.

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Rolex are the same. Many years ago I asked Rolex to value my wife’s Rolex for insurance purposes. I was told that if it was serviced by Rolex they would replace the Crystal from the one fitted (which was Sapphire ) to Acrylic. The reason is that when they service a Rolex they strive to return it back to as near as possible to its original condition. Guess what my decision was!!!

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2 hours ago, hourtime said:

rather than perform a simple lacquer repair,

Perhaps you need to inform them and teach them how to do this simple repair? The reality is from talking to people at the service center is they service watches basically in an assembly line sort of. The watches are separated from their case they go in one direction a watchmaker gets the movements they have to do a certain quantity of movements each day. Everything is restored to new. There supposed to have a very very large spare parts room.

 

2 hours ago, hourtime said:

8 yrs old, (Planet Ocean Dive watch)

I don't suppose I can have the exact model number of the watch? I can't look up anything with a generic phrase I need exact numbers like the number off the case or the serial number?

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