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Hi all

I was asked if I could repair this clock. I declined because I know nothing about clocks. I don't even know what kind or style this might be. I searched online with no luck. I'm still curious and thought you guys might be able to help. Here's a pic of the makers mark. I should've taken pics of the dial and glass globe it sat under. It's got a weighted, spinning regulator with 4 small globes attached. It's about 10" in height. It has a manual wind in the back.

 Look familiar to anyone? Thanks

20201218_204539.jpg

20201218_204530.jpg

20201218_204608.jpg

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Well here I go. Weasol the 400 day clock book arrived and so did the clock. I'm going for it. 

The fork height should be the same as the diagram in the book, if not it can cause what is called fluttering which can upset the running of the clock, a tiny drop of oil between the fork where metal t

Hi Mick, its anniversary clock, manufacturer - Kundo, around 1930 years.   Regards

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Thanks very much guys. I appreciate it. I'm wondering, with my beginner skill set, if I should take it on? I know nothing about clocks, and wonder about parts availability? Hmmm

I'll be passing this info to the owner tho, for sure.  

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52 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Beautifull clocks,  as clockboy said got to be spot on..   Kieniger Obergefel  ( Kundo).  

No wonder I couldn't find anything on the makers mark-I thought they were a "B" and a "C" instead of a K inside of an O 😁

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Hi Mike   I think you would be able to do these , Get the book The Horolovar 400 day clock repair Guide,  by Charles Terwilliger as it contains all the essential information regarding these clocks.  The art is the suspension must be good , correct length/strength and set up correctly on the escapement. They are a bit of a devil to set up but rewarding when done.  I have confidence in the fact you would be ok,  there is plenty of help on here if need be.    cheers

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47 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Hi Mike   I think you would be able to do these , Get the book The Horolovar 400 day clock repair Guide,  by Charles Terwilliger as it contains all the essential information regarding these clocks.  The art is the suspension must be good , correct length/strength and set up correctly on the escapement. They are a bit of a devil to set up but rewarding when done.  I have confidence in the fact you would be ok,  there is plenty of help on here if need be.    cheers

greetings WW the more I look into it, the more I'm inclined to dive in. it looks interesting and I like a challenge. Sure enough the first thing I saw was now what I've learned already, is the torsion spring has broken away from the pendulum, and the mainspring was so tight, it's probably set. I released the energy no problem but that's as far as I wanted to go. one good thing-I can see the parts without magnification!🤓 It's in great shape and looks only to be missing a decorative cover on one of the globes. I've already got a phone call into my buddy, whos wife it belongs to. It is an heirloom handed down to her from her grandparents. stay tuned, I'll be back with this one I think. Already looking into the book on Amazon. Used-$49.99 US.

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Hi Mike   I have several of these clocks and I love them they are easy to work on good quality. Beware of the pivots as like French clocks they are hard but no worse than the average watch but bigger to see.   The thing is to set them up on the level. The book will show you the back plate, suspension set up regarding the blocks and the fork.  once done a little Windles oil on the pivots and away we go. You will be hooked.  ha  ha.

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13 hours ago, watchweasol said:

Hi Mike   I have several of these clocks and I love them they are easy to work on good quality. Beware of the pivots as like French clocks they are hard but no worse than the average watch but bigger to see.   The thing is to set them up on the level. The book will show you the back plate, suspension set up regarding the blocks and the fork.  once done a little Windles oil on the pivots and away we go. You will be hooked.  ha  ha.

Hooked is right. All they had to do was show me...there are several editions of the book. Any difference besides cost, between them? It really looks like fun those visible parts are so inviting I can't believe how big the screws are!😁 The broken torsion spring looks like it could be trouble...parts easy to find or is the usual detective work in order? Yeah I'm already hooked...

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Get the 10th edition of the Horolovar book, it's the most up to date version.

The book will tell which suspension spring to get.

ONLY use Horolovar springs, as they are matched to the book recommendations.  Other makes of spring are available, but there is no reliable way of knowing which spring is needed, due to manufacturing differences.

Likewise measuring the old spring for thickness, unless it is known for certain to be Horolovar, is not reliable.

 

Bod

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As said by Bod  the 10th Edition is the latest and with the correct Horolovar spring and set up as per the manual you will be ok. Hope fully the top and bottom blocks and fork are all there if not there seems a ready supply of bits, I guess Timesavers, Jules Borel etc can supply although there are plenty of bits on the Ebay.    Enjiy the experience  and keep us posted.

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19 hours ago, Bod said:

Get the 10th edition of the Horolovar book, it's the most up to date version.

The book will tell which suspension spring to get.

ONLY use Horolovar springs, as they are matched to the book recommendations.  Other makes of spring are available, but there is no reliable way of knowing which spring is needed, due to manufacturing differences.

Likewise measuring the old spring for thickness, unless it is known for certain to be Horolovar, is not reliable.

 

Bod

Got it. 

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18 hours ago, watchweasol said:

As said by Bod  the 10th Edition is the latest and with the correct Horolovar spring and set up as per the manual you will be ok. Hope fully the top and bottom blocks and fork are all there if not there seems a ready supply of bits, I guess Timesavers, Jules Borel etc can supply although there are plenty of bits on the Ebay.    Enjiy the experience  and keep us posted.

Will do!

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Hi Mike  Looks a handsome clock and I am sure you will get great pleasure in working on it. Take care and take your time, the pivots are hard like French clocks but they are a delight to work on. a read through the book and all will be well.    all the best and good luck.

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Make sure you have a good mainspring winder so you can remove the mainspring and to reinstall it. I have to disagree with watchweasol on the comment on the pivots of these clocks the hardness is nothing like French clocks, turning a pivot down on a 400 (anniversary clock) is like knife to butter soft. 

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10 hours ago, watchweasol said:

the pivots are hard like French clocks

Brand new to clocks of any kind and so far haven't seen anything specific about pivots, yet. What should I expect? Do I need to start thinking about machining or polishing?

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7 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Make sure you have a good mainspring winder so you can remove the mainspring and to reinstall it. I have to disagree with watchweasol on the comment on the pivots of these clocks the hardness is nothing like French clocks, turning a pivot down on a 400 (anniversary clock) is like knife to butter soft. 

I didn't even think about that. All the mainspring winders I have are for pocketwatches and wristwatches. I'm betting now there are winders meant just for these? Welp!

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Just now, MechanicMike said:

pivots of these clocks the hardness is nothing like French clocks, turning a pivot down on a 400 (anniversary clock) is like knife to butter soft

There it is again: pivots. Am I going to need special tools? 

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10 hours ago, watchweasol said:

read through the book

The book is terrific. Whole new world. You know, I've seen these before over the years but never really paid attention to them. The craftsmanship is amazing. 

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54 minutes ago, MechanicMike said:

There it is again: pivots. Am I going to need special tools? 

https://perrinwatchparts.com/collections/clock-bushing-tools

I am myself thinking of buying this 7 PIECE HAND HELD KWM-SIZED BUSHING TOOL SET as the proper tool is very expensive

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/7-PIECE-HAND-HELD-KWM-SIZED-BUSHING-TOOL-SET-for-project/283451935441?hash=item41ff0d4ad1:g:EkoAAOSwY8BbhDju

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I'm now seeing two very different clock movements, which will be confusing to some members. Please keep it to the original which was about the 400 day anniversary clock. 

Poljot the workings of your clock have nothing to do with the 400 day. What you have posted is a photo of a open spring movement with a strike works and it has lantern pinions.  

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