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Omega Constellation Chronometer 1976 1250 wont run


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Hi folks in short I have a omega constellation chronometer with 1250 movement 300 Hz I put a new battery in it and it will not run this watch looks like brand new hardly anywhere on it at all original crystal has the logo in the center this watch is immaculateBut with new battery it will not run. Thank you so much please help God bless Brad

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Hello Brad and welcome to the forum,  First thing is to try it on a line release unit to see if the hands cycle under power.  Remove battery first.  if thats ok  put a drop of oil on the pivot tops you can see and cycle again and then re try with a battery if still a non starter check the continuity if the coil.  and if you can the output of the block for pulses  using a meter on the micro amps scale.  Attached is the tech sheet for the omega.

486_Omega1250,1255,1260_New0713.pdf

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God bless you and thank you for your help first off can you draw an arrow to the pivot tops on the diagram that you sent me I have to be honest with you I’m just learning and wow you’re just a whole lot to learn I need to get this watch running. 
I Really need to get this water running bad I appreciate your help I really really do thank you waiting to hear from you blessings regards Brad

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16 hours ago, Bradlandry said:

I’m just learning and wow you’re just a whole lot to learn I need to get this watch running. 

out of curiosity is this your first watch to service?

then just to be clear does your watch look like they watch in the picture at the link below?

if so you should look carefully and notice that will have to taken apart if you really want to oil the pivots. That's because the two pivots that are visible have cap jewels which prevent you from putting oil on them. were going to have to disassemble if you really want to lubricate. But I would probably do some diagnostics first like when the battery is in and you listen to the watch can you hear anything like a humming sound from the tuning fork that is assuming it is like the watch below?.

https://calibercorner.com/omega-caliber-1250/

 

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On 11/21/2020 at 4:11 PM, watchweasol said:

Hello Brad and welcome to the forum,  First thing is to try it on a line release unit to see if the hands cycle under power.  Remove battery first.  if thats ok  put a drop of oil on the pivot tops you can see and cycle again and then re try with a battery if still a non starter check the continuity if the coil.  and if you can the output of the block for pulses  using a meter on the micro amps scale.  Attached is the tech sheet for the omega.

486_Omega1250,1255,1260_New0713.pdf 3.34 MB · 17 downloads

Hi @watchweasol   Back in 2006 I bought a used Omega tuning fork which turned out to run fast, had it suposedly repaired but run as fast as before, don't know the first thing about repairing tuning forks and heard going crazy to run fast runs in the family with them, so I run away from tuning fork at sight. 

Are you experienced with tuning fork, how repairable would you say they are?

I like to learn repairing them and can buy ill ones here,  providing you have the cure and teach me. 

Regs 

Joe

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Hi Joe  Never had one through my hands but as far as I have found out they are mostly based on the bulova movements and as such there are bits available some new some via the net. The documentation is a bit sketchy but ususly can be dug up some where.  I would say they are no harder to repair than any other watch just need a different approach. The standard quartz we all know  well enough ,its construction and operation, but the tuning fork is a different beast and the first thing to grasp is the operation principals ( how it works), and having worked that out the next best thing is to have a go, Document every stage and take notes.  I think some of the earlier movements had trimmers for adjusting the frequency. I shall have to do some research and see where it leads me.

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7 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

run fast

typically they're not supposed to run fast if they run fast somebody didn't phase the watch correctly. Or they didn't phase the watch taking into account that there now using a silver cell with a higher voltage.

17 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

I would say they are no harder to repair than any other watch just need a different approach.

perhaps today this is true because were all familiar with quartz watches. At the time in the tuning fork watch came out Bulova discovered the watchmakers were having issues. So they had a several day training program. Unlike the training programs or stuff the other watch companies were doing where you got a certificate just to be there this was different. Two days of intense training with a written and practical exam. Only those people that passed got the certificate and could call themselves a Certified Accutron Technician.

as this is an electric watch the same test equipment you have for quartz watches will work fine. Variable voltage power supply with the ability to measure microamps. Unlike quartz watch repair a microscope is necessary to do the phasing. The index wheel and the jewels associated are really tiny and a microscope would be rather nice here.

to get you started I have some light reading. The 214 service manual is really where it all get started so it explains about how it works phasing etc. Then there's a fact book that explains similar stuff. then the Omega tuning fork in this discussion wasn't really made by Omega. The Swiss needing their own tuning fork watch designed a new tuning fork watch and it was sold by a whole bunch a Swiss companies. I have the manual for that and this is interesting watch as it implemented all sorts of improvements to make it much easier to work on.

then an interesting link. Notice they have a reference to how to phase the tuning fork watch to run at a higher voltage. These watches were designed specifically to run with Mercury batteries and were never meant to run on silver cells with the higher voltage. This requires a slightly different procedure for phasing which is why you require a variable voltage power supply.

http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/acc.htm

Accutron 214 ServiceManual.pdf Accutron Facts Booklet.pdf ESA 9162 Repair Manual Omega 1250.pdf

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On 11/28/2020 at 3:54 AM, JohnR725 said:

out of curiosity is this your first watch to service?

then just to be clear does your watch look like they watch in the picture at the link below?

if so you should look carefully and notice that will have to taken apart if you really want to oil the pivots. That's because the two pivots that are visible have cap jewels which prevent you from putting oil on them. were going to have to disassemble if you really want to lubricate. But I would probably do some diagnostics first like when the battery is in and you listen to the watch can you hear anything like a humming sound from the tuning fork that is assuming it is like the watch below?.

https://calibercorner.com/omega-caliber-1250/

 

Yes Sir it is identical to the 1250 you posted in the link.

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On 11/28/2020 at 3:54 AM, JohnR725 said:

out of curiosity is this your first watch to service?

then just to be clear does your watch look like they watch in the picture at the link below?

if so you should look carefully and notice that will have to taken apart if you really want to oil the pivots. That's because the two pivots that are visible have cap jewels which prevent you from putting oil on them. were going to have to disassemble if you really want to lubricate. But I would probably do some diagnostics first like when the battery is in and you listen to the watch can you hear anything like a humming sound from the tuning fork that is assuming it is like the watch below?.

https://calibercorner.com/omega-caliber-1250/

 

Sir there is absolutely no humming or any sound coming from the watch, that was the first thing I did, I did find a man who has these movements about 7 of them new but I can’t afford, I just have to figure this out and it won’t be easy for me as my eyes are failing. 

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On 12/3/2020 at 12:53 PM, Bradlandry said:

Yes Sir it is identical to the 1250 you posted in the link.

I’m very sorry guys I’ve been cut out not feeling well Omega went into a Ziploc and it’s in the drawer my eyes are kind a messed up, can’t focus I don’t know what to do, I love the watch but can’t afford to pay out what they want, I did find a guy that had these movements he’s got like seven of them and they’re brand new and they’re made by Bulova but they don’t say omega on them and he tells me that he will give me $100 trade-in for my little bit and put want to hate you I’m reluctant what should I do guys please help merry Christmas and God bless BradI did find a guy that had these movements he’s got like seven of them and they’re brand new and they’re made by Bulova but they don’t say omega on them and he tells me that he will give me $100 trade-in for my little bit and put want to hate you I’m reluctant what should I do guys please help merry Christmas and God bless Brad

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24 minutes ago, Bradlandry said:

I love the watch but can’t afford to pay out what they want, I did find a guy that had these movements he’s got like seven of them and they’re brand new and they’re made by Bulova

We have two problems here. The first problem that actually is very common is sticker shock over the cost of getting a watch repaired. Then if it's a watch like this which had limited quantity of people to repair it in the first place the cost will go up. This is of course one of the reasons this group exists some people can repair their own watches and not have to pay to have it done. But unfortunately repairing one watch like this that requires specialized tools means that is not going to be cheap even for you to repair. Then the chances success also drops because these watches definitely require somebody with the skill and knowledge to repair them.

Then the second problem that the watch that you're looking to purchase is made by Bulova? I have a link if you scroll down the link you'll get to a section titled "ESA". This is where the other watch companies feeling left out that they didn't have a tuning fork watch make one and attempt to get around Bulova's patents. They're not entirely successful so if you notice on the movement is a reference licensed to Bulova.

So the Swiss come up with two separate movements ESA 9162 (date only) and ESA 9164 (day and date). Sold by a whole variety accompanies who put their name on the movement. Also they come in a variety of colors basically Omega rose gold others will be goals and some will be nickel plated.

So to replace your Omega movement you just need to get one of these movements but you want to be careful that the seller is actually selling you one of these and not one of the Bulova movements which will not replace your movement. Hopefully that makes sense if were lucky the seller is just confused because it does have the word licensed the Bulova and maybe they think it meant that Bulova made the movement which they did Not.

https://electric-watches.co.uk/movement-types/tuning-fork/

 

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On 12/10/2020 at 3:47 PM, JohnR725 said:

We have two problems here. The first problem that actually is very common is sticker shock over the cost of getting a watch repaired. Then if it's a watch like this which had limited quantity of people to repair it in the first place the cost will go up. This is of course one of the reasons this group exists some people can repair their own watches and not have to pay to have it done. But unfortunately repairing one watch like this that requires specialized tools means that is not going to be cheap even for you to repair. Then the chances success also drops because these watches definitely require somebody with the skill and knowledge to repair them.

Then the second problem that the watch that you're looking to purchase is made by Bulova? I have a link if you scroll down the link you'll get to a section titled "ESA". This is where the other watch companies feeling left out that they didn't have a tuning fork watch make one and attempt to get around Bulova's patents. They're not entirely successful so if you notice on the movement is a reference licensed to Bulova.

So the Swiss come up with two separate movements ESA 9162 (date only) and ESA 9164 (day and date). Sold by a whole variety accompanies who put their name on the movement. Also they come in a variety of colors basically Omega rose gold others will be goals and some will be nickel plated.

So to replace your Omega movement you just need to get one of these movements but you want to be careful that the seller is actually selling you one of these and not one of the Bulova movements which will not replace your movement. Hopefully that makes sense if were lucky the seller is just confused because it does have the word licensed the Bulova and maybe they think it meant that Bulova made the movement which they did Not.

https://electric-watches.co.uk/movement-types/tuning-fork/

 

Thank you so much and I will retrieve a picture tire for you,

regards Brad

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28 minutes ago, Bradlandry said:

Omega no longer manufactures the Omega f300 movements for their watches including Longine, Movado, Zeneth, IWC, Tissot, Baume & Mercier, Eterna, Titus, and others. ESA manufactures a replacement movement for the Bulova Licensed f300. Every part of the ESA movement will interchange with the Omega f300 Cal. 1250, model 1262/1264. If you replace your f300 movement with this ESA movement it is considered "plug & play". this Is what he told me Will

regards Brad

Below is the movement Will

Regards Brad

A9DF62D8-D5BD-4ED0-96BF-FCDF9F5FA6EA.jpeg

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I have also a problem with a Omega 1250 movement where the vibration from the tuning fork is transformed to a rotation at the wheel by the click jewels. The parts are so small so my optical tools is not up to the need, probably old oxidation from the battery and the silicone gasket have created the problem. Are the cogs there and is there the needed space of   1/100 mm between wheel and click jewels. Now am I also unsure if the pivots of the wheel is broken. Note the size tip of a toothpick close to the wheel with + 300 cogs. 

A change to a ESA 9162 (date) movement in the Omega will give me a working watch but without the bronze colored movement and a missed logo on the movement. I also purchased a  working Tissonic Electronic ESA 9164 (day date) for parts, but it's to good to be scraped for parts.

tuning fork omega.PNG

omega 1250.jpg

tissonic.jpg

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Hello Brad. 

If this was an audemars piguet, we could hope you somehow get your hands on parts needed and get the watch running and showing time, though chances of it running up to audemars standard would be about zero.

I hate to sound or be discouraging, but pay close attention to what John says here.

On 12/11/2020 at 1:17 AM, JohnR725 said:

   these watches definitely require somebody with the skill and knowledge to repair them

 

Best wishes

Joe

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1 hour ago, CMW said:

I have notice that, that's why i think that my strategy will be to exchange movement.

/ Carl

There too, I sense a potential problem. The brand new movement you pay good money for, will be a NOS piece oiled when made back 30 years ago such oil expectedly serves you a couple months or weeks, soon the 30 year old oil will need a clean and lube again.

The question I think I know the answer to is, why did the seller sold you an Omega with immmacculate clean looks in the first place?

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I got my watch in exchange for a broken car, project for project and I doesn't requires so much space ?.

You are right of the need for service on a movement that is about 40 year, but there are some alternatives here.

The upper part of the movement (fork part) have four strews and shall allays be removed before the movement is removed from case.

The none humming part of the watch has mostly standard parts, and couldn't be that hard to service.

 

 

 

omega 1250_inner part.jpg

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