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Seiko Kinetic


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Hi. I have a Seiko Kinetic. About thirty years old. It stopped about three years ago. I sent it away and the battery was replaced. (I didn’t even know it had a battery.) Now it is starting to go again, with the second hand ticking two seconds at a time. I’m surprised – and wonder if it is the same problem, or a different one (eg, capacitor). I would prefer to send it to someone who know what they are doing, but how to go about finding such a person? Or should I tackle it myself?

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Life expectancy of solar cells that convert photon energy to electric is about twenty years, so your watch has done lived its useful life.

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Hi   It is possible to change the capacitor/cell with a few tools,  we need pictured of the watch movement to determine the make and if possible the caliber number,   capacitor /cells cost approx £10 depending on make.

A watch of 30 yrs has done well but deserves a chance.

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Hi  the model is a seiko 5M42A and I have attached th tech sheet for you as it contains a lot of important information should you decide to do it youself.  also attached id the capacitor.cell list for all the relavant models. this will give you a fighting chance with the DIY option.       good luck.       cheers

Seiko 5M42A, 5M43A.pdf Batteries - Seiko Capacitors (2).pdf

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1 hour ago, Nucejoe said:

Life expectancy of solar cells that convert photon energy to electric is about twenty years, so your watch has done lived its useful life.

Ooops , I was talking solar seiko. old age.

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Thanks very much for the information sheets. I don’t want to push my luck... but I am not sure that I am up to the job.

Are you able to recommend a professional who might do the work?

 

 

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Hi Depending on your location  The British Horological Institute in the UK will supply a list of Bona Fide repairers or in the States  the AWCCI, American watch and Collecters Institute will be able to do the same.

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The original storage cell in Seiko Kinetic movements was I believe a capacitor, the new replacement cells are a lithium polymer rechargeable battery. 

The new batteries have a much higher capacity than the original capacitors which has two consequences, the first of which is that from fully charged it can last months of static storage before the watch stops, the second of which is that it takes a lot more movement to charge it up and so takes longer to get it out of the 2 second tick zone.

You may need to do an extended period of charging exercise to get enough power into it in the first place but once there you should be fine.

If the problem persists though you may want to check the free running of the rotor as if this gets tight charging efficiency will be impared.

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Replacing the capacitor on this watch is not difficult, provided you have the basic tools of a reasonable quality, and the confidence to use them properly. 

1)Separate the strap.

2)Remove the case back.

3)Unscrew the rotor retaining screw.

4)Remove rotor and drive wheel.

5)Unscrew the two screws that retain capacitor cover.

6)Remove capacitor cover and insulator.

7)Remove capacitor.

Reassemble in reverse order.

Problems you may encounter include:- 

trying to find one or both of the loose capacitor retaining screws (escapology on a par with Houdini at his best!!).

maintaining the lightweight thin plastic capacitor insulator in the correct position whilst reaffixing the retaining cover.

Hope this is of help.

 

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Philip

That’s so kind of you. I shall give it a shot. I have tried to recharge the existing capacitor over the last forty-eight hours and if I carry on much longer I think my wrist will drop off.  

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