Jump to content
  • 0

Great Results with experiment in restoring patina and mold in vintage watch lume!


Question

Hey guys long time just wanted to share some finding with you,

I have been searching for a way to clean vintage watch lume, particularly in Seiko's which seems to be one of the top brands where collectors look for clean original lume. Esp when it comes to the 6105's, re-lumes kill the value of these, an old moldy patina lume is better than a re-lume, but is obviously not as good as nice clean white lume. These pull in prices that go for about double the cost of an original moldy lumed one.

SO i picked up an all original 72' 6105 very clean, except for dial it wasnt that bad really but one of the markers was a coffee color much darker than the other which where like a nice off white cream color, some tiny black mold spots. it was really getting on my nerves so as usual i did my research again and find out that every forum post and every person i spoke said the only thing you can do is re-lume? now i have seen pros like spencer klein clean up lume without reluming but he always skips that part in his videos, a master will never reveal his secrets....so i did something i wanted to do for a very long time but was always afraid to do.........I used bleach, YES BLEACH!

Now, this will only work on water based lume, and it does NOT dissolve it any way......you must must be very careful to only get it on the lume and NOT on the dial. I have tried it on many scrap dials and what i found is it wont affect metal dials much but it will affect matte dials, black dials, and dials with any kind of paint. I used a tiny cotton swap used for car touch paint for chips and i soaked in 3/1 or even 2/1 water/bleach solution. i made sure to remove excess and then i would carefully dab the lume plots until i can see it has been absorbed. In some cases i put a tiny bead of the solution on top of the plot and leave it for about 30 min. then soak it back up. This will require more than one application depending on how dark the lume is. I also used a dry swab and gently wiped the top of the lume plot and this removed almost all of the black mold. I went from cream/coffee color to an off white....i am trying to post photos but i cant for some reason...i didnt have a before picture but i will be doing a few more soon on a 6309 dial i will post the before and afters.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I have been meaning to give this a go too. Glad to see you had good results with it. I'll need to give it a try.

Bleach, more specifically hypochlorite bleach is what is in those expensive bottle of spray on mould cleaner you get in the supermarket. In other words, you could just use diluted household bleach and get the same affect.  It also kills the mould, so hopefully stopping it in its tracks.

You would need to be very careful with the stuff obviously, as it will affect a lot of things with colour or pigment in. 

Hydrogen peroxide used in some hair bleach products may also work, and may be more suitable for some substrates than hypochlorite. Testing on scrap dials will give you some idea of what will work where.

Edited by AndyHull
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
4 hours ago, AndyHull said:

I have been meaning to give this a go too. Glad to see you had good results with it. I'll need to give it a try.

Bleach, more specifically hypochlorite bleach is what is in those expensive bottle of spray on mould cleaner you get in the supermarket. In other words, you could just use diluted household bleach and get the same affect.  It also kills the mould, so hopefully stopping it in its tracks.

You would need to be very careful with the stuff obviously, as it will affect a lot of things with colour or pigment in. 

Hydrogen peroxide used in some hair bleach products may also work, and may be more suitable for some substrates than hypochlorite. Testing on scrap dials will give you some idea of what will work where.

peroxide gotta try that too. yes you def need to be careful with the bleach, if you get a little on the dial just quickly wipe it up or use an air duster to dry it up.....it is somewhat forgiving, but extra care is needed with black dials like the seikos...watches that have lume plots like the 6105 makes it much easier than a lumed matte dial like the 6309.

Edited by saswatch88
Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Dear,   I regulated an NH35 movement. I got it perfect. No beat error and -2/+2 seconds. Amplitude was high and healthy. After a few minutes it stopped ticking. After moving it a bit it started but the amplitude was below 130 and the timegrapher hardly got a reading. Now it doesnt even move. I removed the balance complete and checked that the pallet fork has power (see video). It does have power I reinstalled the balance complete and checked if the hairspring moves freely (see video). It does I uploaded some pictures so you can check the hairspring. I have also checked the jewel and it seems to be ok.   Do you guys have any advice? As you can see I'm very much a novice and an amateur but thank you for your time.   Jasper   VID_20210118_095929.mp4 VID_20210118_100403.mp4
    • Hi,   I'm Jasper from Belgium and I followed Mark's course. I am an absolute amateur but will enjoy joining the forums and posting my questions!   Thanks
    • That reminded me of the show "Whose line is it anyway?" I caught a few segments of it on TikTok. Brought back some old memories.  Anyone remembers "The Benny Hill Show"? I'm sure the members from UK would!
    • Most mechanical watches will tick a few seconds, some for up to a minute, when shaken as there will be some residual power left. If it ticks for more than a few minutes then it could be a sign the mechanism needs a service. Also a faulty watch (damaged pivot etc) pivot may allow the watch to run a while but will eventually stop and then restart when shaken. Anilv  
    • I've been trying to find a slotting file to cut the screw heads, but haven't found one fine enough. Nor have I found any under cutters. So I ended up using the balance screw cutters. As long as you don't cut too much, it looks OK (usually it's a very small amount to remove). I just hold it with a finger against a staking block, without taking the hairspring off - which is how I damaged the Omega hairspring 😧.  If you have one of the balance holders I mentioned above - it would be easy. Depending on the size of the balance, you might be able to use a staking set - press down on one of the balance arms with a flat ended punch ?
×
×
  • Create New...