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Jacot tool and pivot file burnisher question


clockboy
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I have been searching for a Jacot tool but I have found  many come without a Bow.

My question is, I can purchase a bow from Cousins but it suggests   "Tie a piece of cotton string form both ends". Is this correct just thinking of its strength etc.

Edited by clockboy
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Here you are Mark, ten minutes work. This one is made with 1.6mm piano wire and I slipped a plastic sleeve over it. The ends were shaped cold with round nose pliers then trimmed. I used a very tough upholstery thread to string it and it works a treat. In my earlier post I suggested using 2mm piano wire, but 1.6mm works just fine.

9334a1bd-fc5b-4bcc-8518-e7bad6550b51.jpg

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I mentioned this before but I can't remember to whom, but you will usually find a good selection of quality Jacot tools on the eBay.de (German) website. Pickings can be a bit slim in the UK.

 

If you are a BHI member then the annual auction usually throws up some good stuff.

 

If buying through eBay make sure the seller takes close up photos of the lanterns as they are often the first bits to get damaged - a mate of mine got stung in the past this way.

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If buying through eBay make sure the seller takes close up photos of the lanterns as they are often the first bits to get damaged - a mate of mine got stung in the past this way.

I had the same problem. The tool is in excellent condition apart from that and luckily the seller refunded a large percentage of the cost.

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I mentioned this before but I can't remember to whom, but you will usually find a good selection of quality Jacot tools on the eBay.de (German) website. Pickings can be a bit slim in the UK.

 

If you are a BHI member then the annual auction usually throws up some good stuff.

 

If buying through eBay make sure the seller takes close up photos of the lanterns as they are often the first bits to get damaged - a mate of mine got stung in the past this way.

I got burned on two seperate sets with worn and totally unusable lanterns.

Hi Mark,

It was me that you directed to look at ebay.de

And I did find a beautifully complete Steiner Jacot tool that was in near perfect condition for $300US! I remember finding the exact same set on the current manufacturers website for almost $3000.

My only problem was finding a seller that would ship to the US as not many would...

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I got burned on two seperate sets with worn and totally unusable lanterns.

Hi Mark,

It was me that you directed to look at ebay.de

And I did find a beautifully complete Steiner Jacot tool that was in near perfect condition for $300US! I remember finding the exact same set on the current manufacturers website for almost $3000.

My only problem was finding a seller that would ship to the US as not many would...

 

Awesome!

 

I got my Elma Cyclomat from germany and a nice JKA Feintaster.

 

A couple of good searches:

 

http://www.ebay.de/sch/i.html?_sacat=0&_nkw=uhrmacherdrehbank&_frs=1

http://www.ebay.de/sch/Drehmaschinen-baenke-/74498/i.html

http://www.ebay.de/sch/Uhrmacherwerkzeug-/63200/i.html?_nkw=lorch&_frs=1

 

And if you want a great measuring tool:

http://www.ebay.de/sch/i.html?_odkw=feintaster&_from=R40&_osacat=63200&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0&_nkw=feintaster&_sacat=281

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I know some people attach motors, but to me you will lose the sensitive touch required. Even my lathe which is powered has a safety driver to be used locked in the headstock when using the jacot drum. If something goes wrong when it is motor driven it could be disasterous.

If it was simply for polishing I can understand a motor being used, but for burnishing (work hardening the surface) then think a bow would be the better way.

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Just recieved my Jacot.

 

All good apart from the lantern on the smallest of pivots (1-12mm) is missing.have the opportunity to send back or get a partial refund.

 

Im assuming the smallest lantern will be required on balance staffs?

 

2ef3hfl.jpg

Edited by jnash
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I agree with Geo. The reason I am looking to purchase a Jacot tool is to get more sensitivity which my lathe lacks. I have a foot pedal controller but things can still run away & out of control very quickly if not careful.

 

Agreed, for pivot polishing you have to feel what you are doing. A motor takes most of your control away.

However, when making a new staff I like to size the final pivot diameter on the Jacot tool and I have often wondered wether what it would turn out like using a motor driven Jacot like a Rollifit - check it out:

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=rollifit&espv=2&biw=1815&bih=905&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=0J9kVPW2FI7varzCgoAD&ved=0CCMQsAQ

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Just recieved my Jacot.

 

All good apart from the lantern on the smallest of pivots (1-12mm) is missing.have the opportunity to send back or get a partial refund.

 

Im assuming the smallest lantern will be required on balance staffs?

 

2ef3hfl.jpg

 

Personally I would send that back - it's next to useless.

 

Check this one out - I can't see the lanterns properly but there seems to be spares in the box.

 

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Tour-a-pivoter-Steiner-Jacot-tool-lathe-Zapfenrolliergerat-Rolliersthul-Rollifit-/151472992713?pt=FR_YO_Bijoux8horlogerie_HorlogesPendules&hash=item23447e71c9

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Personally I would send that back - it's next to useless.

Check this one out - I can't see the lanterns properly but there seems to be spares in the box.

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Tour-a-pivoter-Steiner-Jacot-tool-lathe-Zapfenrolliergerat-Rolliersthul-Rollifit-/151472992713?pt=FR_YO_Bijoux8horlogerie_HorlogesPendules&hash=item23447e71c9

Its being sent back as we speak, its come at a bad time as it seems my Cowells lathe is damaged. So the refund will go to the spindle being fixed now...
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You have a great blog by the way. Some great info on there.

You can link it in our Blog section if you like - just click to Add a blog and choose to "Link external Blog"

Thanks, would love to spend more time on the hobby however work takes priority. I'll add the blog thanks
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