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Tool or technique for dealing with shock spring on Luch 2209 Russian movement


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I'm working on this movement:  https://www.2209watchmovement.com/

I am at this point in trying to put the movement back together

 

I'm really struggling to get the shock spring back in place.  I'm just not able to do it.  This guy makes it look simple.  

I know that there are special tools to help with the removal and reseating of end jewel shock springs, e.g. diashock

Is there a tool that someone would recommend for this movement or similar Russian movements?

I've googled like mad and the antishock type that most closely resembles this movement's is called the "Brac Dip Resomatic"

Does anyone know of a tool that would make this task simpler?

If not, is there a video that demonstrates an effective technique for dealing with this kind of shock spring?

Thanks,

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The technique in the video looks correct. I don't think you will find a better one. Maybe you have the wrong spring, or the jewel is sitting too high.

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I have used in the past a piece of peg wood which I shaped to fit the spring. However I now use the method used in the vid but the peg wood method is safer.

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I'm wondering if the jewel isn't seated well, but looking through the loupe it seems correct...to my newbie eyes at least.

I've got 10 of these movements I bought off etsy and I'm working to see if I can create at least one working movement from them.  My motivation is a 2209 watch I bought off ebay with really low amplitude.  I don't dare try to work on it till I get more experience, hence the tinkering.  

Someone on another forum, in response to a question similar to mine, mentioned using a Bergeon 31081 Novodiac Shock Spring Tool on this kind of spring, so I've ordered one.  Other responses included using a tooth pick in the center hole.  Feels like I might need three hands.

 

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You might break all the rules as long as the outcome is alright.

No pegwood neither any tool has a feel to it like your hand and fingers do. If you have  surgical gloves to wear, then by all means do, if not fine.

Hold the movement in your hand if you like, you might place two prongs in the groove and turn to get the third one in, hold the spring down by laying a safety razor blade on it or  anything flat you feel comfortable to use, just get the shock spring in the groove however you can and messy it may sound or get, then rinse the mainplate with jewels and spring installed. use of a soft brush on the mainplate or the cock ( with jewel assembly installed) when submerged in lighter fluid is alright, blow dry with hairdryer, when you rinse after installing jewel assemblies , you have done a much neater job than the guy in the vid , then lube. 

As you get more confident by practicing and doing more movements, you find funny  your words that you just can't do it.

Good luck pal.

 

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Two tips I forgot to mention. 1) de-magnetise the spring and make sure your tools are also de-magnetised. These blighters have life of their own. 2) as a precaution especially is this is the first time installing a shock spring cover the area with cling film. 

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Thanks to all for the great advice and encouragement.

I've stepped away from this movement for the moment, but will be returning to it in the coming days.

In the mean time, watch our Fearless Leader show his impeccable skills at dealing with this soviet menace:

 

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I've been able to get this spring back in place.

The Bergeon Novodiac spring tools I mentioned above was very useful for this.  This tool, and a sharpened bit of peg wood to press the spring into its seating slot make short work of these strange springs.

Here's the tool itself:  https://www.esslinger.com/bergeon-31081-novodiac-shock-spring-tool-for-eta-2801/

Here's a video from another watchmaker who deals with this kind of spring by creating his own tool from a q-tip:

I've got a 2209 movement up and running now.  Still more work to be done before it is finished, but making good progress considering it was built from parts taken from scrap movements.

 

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If you think the Kif or Diashock is bad, I just did a Swiss made Timex with a shock spring that looks like a Kif. But instead of the usual  1 opening for the ends of the spring, it had 3! So the usual method as described by Nucejoe doesn't work. It took me about 45mins to get it back in. I had to use another pair of tweezers in my left hand and keep the tips slightly apart to press on 2 prongs simultaneously while using another tweezer in my right hand to press the 3rd prong down and turn it until it locks.

A Kif spring tool would probably have worked but it's a Timex. So anything goes...

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I agree these 3-legged springs are awful. I just used 2 fine pairs of tweezers and kept poking and prodding until it was in. Practice makes perfect! 

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