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Dial feet repair - All techniques


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Hi  I have found these diagrams, they are what I based mine on  although mine uses an external power source, the use of a transformer makes it portable, I am at the moment redesigning one with a trans

Brasswire doesnt work well at all. Most if not all dial feet are copper which is the best. I have done several dials using a machine I build similar to the Fassbender machine and never had a problem w

Years ago I would use what were called dial spots. Little spots you pealed off and stuck them on the movement. You could remove the dial with no trouble at all.

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Hi Having watched the Video I get your point. The Idea as you know is to make a seating for the new foot.  The same could be done using a staking tool and a punch to create the seat, or as I do use a small drill in a pin vice.  My Method is to remove the calender work if fitted them re fit the dial using blu tack spots to center the dial and aligned with the stem which should be re fitted  then with a suitable drill , run it through the dial foot holes making a seat for the new foot. It is then transfered to the soldering tool and the wire is soldered using the tool. Attached pictures of actual jobs done.

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Hi ww and thanks once again.

I'm sure you can appreciate that in no way is this tool going to make a precision recess....I'll be sending it back to the seller. On the other hand, although it seems, to me at least, a scary and potentially damaging system, your soldering machine seems to be the way to go. I guess I'll just have to bite the bullet, get over my angst and go for it.

Cheers,

Mike

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Hi Mike   The one I build was based on both the Dirk Fassbender machine and  an article by Wesley R Door in his book   "rettrofitting when there is a need".

I dispensed with the transformer and used the charger purely because it has over current protection and it was available. as you can see the wiring is simple from the inputs + and - two wires red/black ,  Black goes to the post onto which the dial is screwed. The red goes via a led (on) and the operating switch and the probe jack, which is plug in for convenience. once the dial is mounted on the post the foot wire is passed through a hole on the crossbar and secured and aligned to the foot position on the dial. A touch of flux and a couple of solder chips(or if you prefer solder/flux paste) is placed at the contact point. The machine switched on and the probe (Carbon rod salvaged from a battery) is placed  on the foot wire about 1cm above the dial. The switch is pressed and an arc forms at the joint melting the solder  it only takes as long as to melt the solder . No more.  Hope this explains the basics.  cheers

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