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Dial feet repair - All techniques


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Hi  I have found these diagrams, they are what I based mine on  although mine uses an external power source, the use of a transformer makes it portable, I am at the moment redesigning one with a trans

Brasswire doesnt work well at all. Most if not all dial feet are copper which is the best. I have done several dials using a machine I build similar to the Fassbender machine and never had a problem w

Years ago I would use what were called dial spots. Little spots you pealed off and stuck them on the movement. You could remove the dial with no trouble at all.

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Why bother with the solder at all if you're going to glue it to the dial? Just turn a dial foot with a flange using your lathe, you won't have to worry about alignment, or having to trim back excess solder.

You can buy dial feet with flanges & tried with glue but for some reason they would not stick even with JB weld. 

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These are double sided tape dots to make the pictured dial feet stick. I use them all the time, they work and for low volume the combination is cheaper.

msa99.153a.jpg  + dialdotround.jpg = tagheuerdial.jpg  or US$5 + US$20 = US$25

 

Result: A happy dial because it can walk again....err, with feet? :)

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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These are double sided tape dots to make the pictured dial feet stick. I use them all the time, they work and for low volume the combination is cheaper.

msa99.153a.jpg  + dialdotround.jpg = tagheuerdial.jpg  or US$5 + US$20 = US$25

 

Result: A happy dial because it can walk again....err, with feet? :)

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

 

I had a go at the bergeon dial feet, they worked really badly, the mm thinkness at the base is enough to stop that hands being held on correctly. And also whatever eproxy you use, is not strong enough to hold them on.

 

I used this guide for them :- http://milspectime.com/?p=20

 

However the J B weld eproxy was no stronger than super glue and came off too many times for me to be confident with them holding the dial in place.

 

The tape dots I hear are good, but I wouldn't be able to sell the watch in conscience if I knew that was done, as it's a bit like just glueing the dial on.

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Once the dial feet are chosen with the right diameter, they have to be filed down so the movement is not inconvenienced in any way with their length. Once the dial + dial feet + dots are properly fit, they have to be let at least 24hrs to set. After that, they are as good as regular dial feet. Mind that the height of the dial respect to the movement varies slightly.

 

I try to avoid dial feet fixes but sometimes it can't be helped. Then, this system works for me and is economic and time efficient.

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Once the dial feet are chosen with the right diameter, they have to be filed down so the movement is not inconvenienced in any way with their length. Once the dial + dial feet + dots are properly fit, they have to be let at least 24hrs to set. After that, they are as good as regular dial feet. Mind that the height of the dial respect to the movement varies slightly.

I try to avoid dial feet fixes but sometimes it can't be helped. Then, this system works for me and is economic and time efficient.

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Once the dial feet are chosen with the right diameter, they have to be filed down so the movement is not inconvenienced in any way with their length. Once the dial + dial feet + dots are properly fit, they have to be let at least 24hrs to set. After that, they are as good as regular dial feet. Mind that the height of the dial respect to the movement varies slightly.

I try to avoid dial feet fixes but sometimes it can't be helped. Then, this system works for me and is economic and time efficient.

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The issue is the dial feet have to be exactly in the correct position especially if the dial has date & day functions. If you do find a glue that works, but the feet are not correct & I mean by the tiniest of amount then you have to release the dial feet but without heat ?

 

I tried to attach the dial feet to the watch then added a tiny bit of glue to the dial feet flanges but found it did not attach correctly because most dials are not flat but concave so therefore extra glue is needed but then you run the danger of the glue dropping on

to the watch.  If that happens then you are really in the poo  :pulling-hair-out:

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If using glue, and those bergeon dial feet.

 

I would just put a bit of paper separating the movement from the dial, cut the feet down to correct size push them through the paper onto movement and glue thinly and evenly on the flanges, and push the dial in the correct position, and let the glue set while on the watch movement. 

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These are double sided tape dots to make the pictured dial feet stick. I use them all the time, they work and for low volume the combination is cheaper.

msa99.153a.jpg

 

 

 

 

o.k......i must have been living under a rock or something. i never knew these existed! very cool. where can i get some?

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This side of the pond I get them from ofrei....I never use glue. The dots allow for dial positioning. This is what I do, I insert the feet in their holes after cutting them to length. Then put the dots on top and finally the dial in the correct position. Then leave it to set.

 

Most of the time the dots are oversize...no problem fold them...they stick on both sides anyway.

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This side of the pond I get them from ofrei....I never use glue. The dots allow for dial positioning. This is what I do, I insert the feet in their holes after cutting them to length. Then put the dots on top and finally the dial in the correct position. Then leave it to set.

 

Most of the time the dots are oversize...no problem fold them...they stick on both sides anyway.

Hi Bob, Cousins in the UK do similar but made of copper. However I have a question the dots you use are they strong.

I can get dial dots wondering if their the same.

Also how much height difference do they make.

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They are mostly like glue once you remove the top backing (very thin material there). The actual height addition is the "head" of the dial feet but since you are pushing them all the way it may not matter after all. The glue on the dots become quite strong but still flexible so if you want to remove it after some time you can easily do that without damaging anything...and you can reuse the feet. The dots also allow for stacking them one on top of another if you want to raise the height of the dial...or anything else for instance.

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I've seen the dial dots in ofrei as well as esslinger but have never used them. I may need to give this a try. But I also like to over-complicate my life sometimes, which is the idea behind making this box. I've heard from several people that they've used the dial dots with good results, but I think this is the first time I see them being used to attach dia feet.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I know it's a very noob question but I also know you guys are very patient!

I have to change a dial and a I have to change the position of the dial feet. Where can I find the right material for new dial feet. What do you guys use for this operation?

Ty and happy Christmas!

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there was a thread on this not too long ago. someone posted a link to a supplier who sells new dial feet that are fixed with those small adhesive dots - dial dots.

just do a search on it. i found it usefel only because i never knew that adhered metal dial feet were available.

i live under a rock apparently........i'll shuit up now.

 

the thread is "dial feet soldering machine" there is a link to dial feet in that thread. it;'s a good read.

Edited by ramrod
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  • jdm changed the title to Dial feet repair - All techniques
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