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Orient 49740 and Seiko 2517B


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the problem is if we look at the site below for instance there is the listing of the Seiko parts you can click on each part you can see what it cross-references to. They also have the Orient but only one part? then we have the third link which claims that orient is now owned by Seiko but they make their own movements in house. It doesn't say anything about rebranding Seiko movements. Although conceivably parts will interchange.

 

 

http://cgi.julesborel.com/cgi-bin/matcgi2?ref=SEK_2517B

http://cgi.julesborel.com/cgi-bin/matcgi2?ref=ORI_49740

https://watchranker.com/orient-watch-review/

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

then we have the third link which claims that orient is now owned by Seiko but they make their own movements in house. It doesn't say anything about rebranding Seiko movements. Although conceivably parts will interchange.

The relationship between Seiko and Orient dates way before the relatively recent acquisition. For example decades ago already Orient was legally using the magic lever auto winding system. Just by looking at them you see a good amount of design commonality. However, Orient movements are different, and generally parts don't interchange.

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10 hours ago, AlexeiJ1 said:

The 7002 and 7s26 movement parts interchange to my knowledge.
I swapped lots of bits such as upper plate, rotor, magic lever, etc.

These are both Seiko movements. The discussion is about Orient and Seiko parts interchangeably.

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13 hours ago, jdm said:

These are both Seiko movements. The discussion is about Orient and Seiko parts interchangeably.

Yep , I meant the 49740 I believe inter-changed with the two seiko movements.

I have now had a look at photos and can see I was wrong.
I was thinking of the 46XXX series I think that was used in the Orient King Diver.

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