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Hi everyone, 

I did some searching on WRT but haven’t been able to find anything really. 
After speaking to a company here that supplies tools and parts to the industry, they suggested that I buy a cheap kit from the internet (I ended up at Esslinger.com) in case I find that watch repairing is not for me. Rationale was that I wouldn’t have spent a whole bunch. 
My concern is that buying cheaper tools can cause you to become frustrated due to the quality.
So in short, does anyone have any sort of idea with regard to these kits?

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Is not like there is much alternative unless you are OK to spend big money.

A Chinese kit is OK to open some (but not all) watches, change batteries, straps, and little more, (but not closing tight snap backs) can be $15 - $25 and worth that. The equivalent Swiss "quick service" is GBP 155,  certainly overpriced for the little  it delivers, still no press or snap-back tool in there, all it takes is a current Swiss watch for sorely missing having these.

The recommendation you have been given is the correct one, find first how much really watch repair takes you in before spending big money.

Remember that is the person that does the job not the tool, although there are many times where the specific tool is needed, sometime it can be made. A poor tool plus beginner's inexperience is a recipe for damaging the watch, let alone frustration. At the same time it happens a lot that beginners break perfectly working watches with perfect tools.

You will hear again and again "buy the best tools you can afford", but in practice that often that means "buy expensive tools", there is a lot of "tool adoration" in watchmaking.

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I have been trawling through both of those as well. There is also a third that I know of.

Australian Watch & Clock Supplies.

With not being able to travel to Melbourne due to all the restrictions, I can't go into any shops to have a look at things and say "Right. This bundle of tools will do me."

Where I live, I would suggest that the most precise tool that I could be would be a ball peen hammer.

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17 hours ago, Michael1962 said:

With not being able to travel to Melbourne due to all the restrictions, I can't go into any shops to have a look at things and say "Right. This bundle of tools will do me."

Surely you aren't the only one. The age of brick and mortar watch material houses is gone to not ever return. The last time I visited one was the week they were closing down, that was in an EU country capital BTW. No big loss, they didn't even had much stuff anyway.

Now everyone buys online and if possible gets an idea first using forums like this.

Edited by jdm
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On 9/14/2020 at 10:22 AM, Michael1962 said:

Hi everyone, 

I did some searching on WRT but haven’t been able to find anything really. 
After speaking to a company here that supplies tools and parts to the industry, they suggested that I buy a cheap kit from the internet (I ended up at Esslinger.com) in case I find that watch repairing is not for me. Rationale was that I wouldn’t have spent a whole bunch. 
My concern is that buying cheaper tools can cause you to become frustrated due to the quality.
So in short, does anyone have any sort of idea with regard to these kits?

I'm not a fan of kits as most that I have ever seen tend to be limiting or poor quality. The high quality kits tend to be aimed towards strap and battery changing/removing links and general after sales rather than on-the-bench watch repairing.

I did create a blog post with some essential "Day 1" tools that are advisable to have on hand when you are creating your tool kit and you may find that useful. https://www.watchrepairlessons.com/2019/09/30/essential-day-1-tools/

Perhaps you could use that as a guide - all of these tools are readily available from many different online sources such as Cousins UK, eBay, Amazon etc etc.. 

There is also a PDF I have made available which may help you decide on your Day 1 lubricants kit which you can download here: 

 

I hope this helps.

 

P.S. - Moving this thread to the tools section

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I am learning about tool quality as I go along also.  I agree with the others on this: good screwdrivers are a must.  Good brass tweezers will be used often.  Generally, the better the case knife is made, the easier it is to use.  Definitely get a demagnetizer at some point, for both movements and tools.  I could probably mention more but the veterans on this forum have posted so much helpful information already. Sometimes the best tools are not always the most expensive; that does occur. And often, getting a more expensive tool is cheaper than buying five crappy ones. Digging through the posts on tools is worth the effort.

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