Jump to content
WillFly

Guda - An Unfamiliar Face - But A Nice Peseux 330 Movement - 1960S

Recommended Posts

I'm not familiar with the Guda watch label - registered in Switzerland in 1958 - but the Peseux 330 movement in it is quite nice and was used in, among other makes, Ulysse Mardin. Spotted on the Bay this evening and snapped up - I was the only bidder. A nice, classic face and in good nick.

 

post-64-0-21016100-1424037473_thumb.jpg

post-64-0-26482500-1424037474_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a better shot of the Peseux 330 movement here. The regulator is right over on the "slow" setting. It's timekeeping is good at the moment, but if it speeds up a service is probably due...

 

post-64-0-44555900-1424686969_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Willfly,  Just picked up a P330 in a UNO watch and about to service and replace lost crown.  If you serviced yours, how did you go about cleaning the top balance jewel as it doe not appear to have any shock spring etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Canthus - no, I haven't serviced this one yet, so I'm not sure how the balance assembly breaks down. I'll check my movement service/data sheets and see if I can find a parts diagram for it.

Cheers,

Will

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The correct way to clean this type of balance pivot is to first of all remove the balance and hair spring from the cock. You can proceed without doing so but there is a significant risk of deforming the hair spring so best practice is to get it out of harms way.

Once the balance and hair spring are removed you will find two screws holding the cap jewel and regulator arm in place from below. The other ends of these screws are visible from the top. With these screws removed the cap jewel can be removed allowing access to the pivot jewel and the under side of the cap jewel for cleaning. Reassembly is simply the reverse.

Lubrication of this type of setting is (as ever with lubrication) a personal thing. I prefer to apply a small spot of oil to the cap jewel prior to reassembly, and then if needs be, and using an extra fine oiler, a very small drop into the pivot jewel prior to reinstalling the balance. Another approach is to reassemble the cap jewel dry, and then apply a larger dose of oil to the pivot jewel so that the balance staff pushes it through to the cap. A third approach (and a very popular one) is to use and automatic oiler through the pivot jewel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Marc/Willfly, Thought this was the case.  Timegrapher is all over the place but looks ok otherwise, so looks like it at least it needs a good clean. Will give it a full service and see what its like then. I have the Peseux 330 sheet from Cousins which gives me all the parts, and it looks straightforward enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

The correct way to clean this type of balance pivot is to first of all remove the balance and hair spring from the cock. You can proceed without doing so but there is a significant risk of deforming the hair spring so best practice is to get it out of harms way.

Once the balance and hair spring are removed you will find two screws holding the cap jewel and regulator arm in place from below. The other ends of these screws are visible from the top. With these screws removed the cap jewel can be removed allowing access to the pivot jewel and the under side of the cap jewel for cleaning. Reassembly is simply the reverse.

Lubrication of this type of setting is (as ever with lubrication) a personal thing. I prefer to apply a small spot of oil to the cap jewel prior to reassembly, and then if needs be, and using an extra fine oiler, a very small drop into the pivot jewel prior to reinstalling the balance. Another approach is to reassemble the cap jewel dry, and then apply a larger dose of oil to the pivot jewel so that the balance staff pushes it through to the cap. A third approach (and a very popular one) is to use and automatic oiler through the pivot jewel.

Personally I don't favour your method although I have used it. My method is I give the whole balance assemably a really good soak in a de- greasing agent & then I re-attach it to the watch plate and put it through my cleaning machine with the other parts. Making sure everything is dry I then lubricate the balance upper & lower jewels with a auto oiler. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Personally I don't favour your method although I have used it. My method is I give the whole balance assemably a really good soak in a de- greasing agent & then I re-attach it to the watch plate and put it through my cleaning machine with the other parts. Making sure everything is dry I then lubricate the balance upper & lower jewels with a auto oiler. 

I like to be able to properly inspect the pivot jewel for chipping and cracking before pegging out. I also like to inspect the friction face of the cap jewel for wear, and the balance staff pivot for distortion, wear , and flatting at the end, all of which can only be achieved with the balance removed from the cock and the jewel setting dismantled.

All of these things can have a significant impact when it comes to regulating the watch, especially if you want to minimise the variation in rate between the horizontal and vertical positions, and as such should be checked as part of a proper service.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...