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Good morning all

 

I recently purchased this Oyster Lipton and was wondering if anyone could shed any light on the dial for me. Personally I have no expertise in restoring dials and wouldn’t like to give it a go myself as I don’t want to make it worse. Would a dial in this state be able to be cleaned up by a professional restorer or would the dial have to be completely refinished? And if so is there anyone who you could recommend. Any input would be greatly appreciated, cheers guys

 

 

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Hi   with a dial in that state I would be inclined to take it out of its case and have a look  at the condition of the watch and under the dial at the front plate.  The stain looks like a rusty water mark coming through the dial. If the damage is only surface deep it would be able to be restored but at a cost.  Diy cleaning may lessen the effect but it wouldnt be permanent.

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1 hour ago, watchweasol said:

Hi   with a dial in that state I would be inclined to take it out of its case and have a look  at the condition of the watch and under the dial at the front plate.  The stain looks like a rusty water mark coming through the dial. If the damage is only surface deep it would be able to be restored but at a cost.  Diy cleaning may lessen the effect but it wouldnt be permanent.

If you do open it be aware that as the watch was manufactured in the 1940's (apparently for the Canadian market) the lume WILL BE RADIUM, so take the appropriate care....................

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I dont think that is rust, under the numerics 1-12 were the blur is there should be the numbers 13-24.

Somehow these have floaten out, probably residues from a previous attemt to fix the dial.
To get this in a good shape you need to leave it to a professional dial restorer who can take that ink away and print new numbers.
Under this hood should be a Rolex Cal. 59, a modified FHF30.
 

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Cheers for all the input guys, I will be talking the watch to a specialist as this is far beyond my capabilities. Once I have the dial back I will post some pictures


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 restored dials decrease the value for many vintage watches such as Rolex, Omega and many other top brands.  Collectors like to see the age and imperfections that develop over time as these make each watch unique in its own way.  Have the movement serviced, and any debris removed from the dials and hands.  

here is one article that supports this - https://www.wpdiamonds.com/watch-damage-affect-resale-value/#:~:text=Older watches with a patina,the authenticity of the watch.

Edited by JerseyMo
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7 hours ago, JerseyMo said:

restored dials decrease the value for many vintage watches such as Rolex, Omega and many other top brands.  Collectors like to see the age and imperfections that develop over time as these make each watch unique in its own way.  Have the movement serviced, and any debris removed from the dials and hands.  

here is one article that supports this - https://www.wpdiamonds.com/watch-damage-affect-resale-value/#:~:text=Older watches with a patina,the authenticity of the watch.

I think the most agrees with this and as a collector myself I would prefer a dial with Normal aging, patina and imperfections which appeared by natural causes.
But sometimes the imperfections occur when someone just wanted to “clean off” the dial a bit.
This often results in a much lighter dial than expected and with print or varnish gone. In this case it will not preserve the price I think.
A small example of what I mean with patina and imperfections can be seen to the left.
This is just my opinion and I think the most professional restorers are gentle and will preserve the dial in a preferred condition.

 

Lipton.thumb.jpg.fcd7c8c0c3889f10ad4d87c307cfe840.jpg

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As a collector of many clocks  they are repaired and tidied up but no restoration. They gathered all the imperfections in life and are an intrinsic part of the Clock/Watch,  its history and to me removing all that to achieve an almost as new clock / watch is sacrilidge, just my opinion there will be others who differ for sure.  All the clocks I repair for others are th same and most clients want it preserved as it is. Some are over 100 Yo you dont live to that age without a few bruises, If I live that long . I have done the 3 score and 10 and still running on reduced power.

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I think the most agrees with this and as a collector myself I would prefer a dial with Normal aging, patina and imperfections which appeared by natural causes.
But sometimes the imperfections occur when someone just wanted to “clean off” the dial a bit.
This often results in a much lighter dial than expected and with print or varnish gone. In this case it will not preserve the price I think.
A small example of what I mean with patina and imperfections can be seen to the left.
This is just my opinion and I think the most professional restorers are gentle and will preserve the dial in a preferred condition.
 
Lipton.thumb.jpg.fcd7c8c0c3889f10ad4d87c307cfe840.jpg

Interesting, when you talk about the price being preserved are you saying having the dial redone will not affect the price? And I agree these markings to the dial do not look natural to me they either.


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why does it matter if the cause is natural or not?   Here is one of my favorite watches When it came in there was no crystal, missing hands and very rusted movement.  Now it shows the scars of time just like me.  Faded some and took some work to get ticking again.  It cost me less than one dollar to purchase and only $45 to have it fully serviced.  The mainspring arbor was rusted and needed replacement.  it cost me $45.  Of course it is all a matter of preferences.  

 

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