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AdamC

New mainspring and Knocking

Question

Hi all,

 

I wonder if you can give any advice. I’ve just completed an unbranded watch from (I think) the 1920’s era (photos to give you an idea). As you can see, the original mainspring is of the old carbon steel type. Being an unidentifiable movement, I calculated the appropriate length using a mainspring calculator and then measured the other dimensions. The thickness/strength of the old spring is 0.11mm. As such I ordered a new S shaped white alloy unbreakable spring of the same thickness. After completing the rebuild, I noticed the galloping sound of the ticking and immediately recognised it as knocking the banking as described in one of Mark’s videos. So my question is twofold:

 

1: is there a formula/general rule for allowing for stronger modern replacement springs?

 

2: is there anything I can do to fix it bar replacing the spring again?

 

The watch has an additional issue in that the setting lever stem end is worn and wasn’t fully engaging the recess to operate the the sliding pinion; i.e., on pushing in the crown, the setting lever jumped out of the stem recess. Rightly or wrongly, I put some dial washers under the lever on the opposite side, and when tightened down it appears to be giving enough pressure to stop it jumping out. Again, without caliber id, I’m unable to source a replacement.

 

Finally, if anyone recognises this early 10.5’’’ movement, I’d love to know. I have suspected an FHF but not sure. All train wheel bridges are separate (unlike those designed to look separate).

 

Thanks in advance for any advice,

Adam

 

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8a39c51ed8ff84e280300c6571bff4b0.jpg&key=940f3dbc8b19ab66bdbf737064e99afc66954b2cd8ef39fba784ccde78fbe590

 

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4 hours ago, rodabod said:

It’s also the spreading effects which are very, very important

I thought in watch repair spreading was considered to be very very bad? This is why you have products like  Epilames found at the link below? Not that it's normally used by most hobbyists as it's too expensive.

http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/epilames

 

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3 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

I thought in watch repair spreading was considered to be very very bad? This is why you have products like  Epilames found at the link below? Not that it's normally used by most hobbyists as it's too expensive.

http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/epilames

 

Yes, that’s exactly correct. It’s important that they do not spread. Mineral oils can be awful for it. 

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15 hours ago, spectre6000 said:

extending service intervals by way of advanced lubrication

I would be really curious to see the press reference that references lubrication? It's my understanding that the watch companies are trying to get away from lubrication using stuff that does not require any lubrication at all. 

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On 8/1/2020 at 4:35 PM, spectre6000 said:

Spreads too much?

Yes. You do not want any spreading. There are many reasons for why it can happen, such as unclean surfaces (especially if there is a minuscule residue film of oil). It effectively causes as similar effect to the oil drying out as it just continues to migrate away from the bearings. Ironically, over-oiling can also cause this effect too if it creates a pathway for the oil to run away to. I've seen that on cap jewels where the oil has spread across the entire chaton and jewel hole, only leaving a thin film everywhere.

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6 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

I would be really curious to see the press reference that references lubrication? It's my understanding that the watch companies are trying to get away from lubrication using stuff that does not require any lubrication at all. 

I don't recall exactly where I saw it. Some manufacturer's announcement about a new movement. It was within the last month or so that I saw it. It was one of the larger groups, but I don't recall exactly which one. Sorry I can't be more specific.

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On 7/28/2020 at 8:52 AM, AdamC said:

Finally, if anyone recognises this early 10.5’’’ movement, I’d love to know. I have suspected an FHF but not sure. All train wheel bridges are separate (unlike those designed to look separate).

If you have suspected this to be an FHF 1146 I think you are right.
There is a spring new at Cousinesuk you could try out.

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If you have suspected this to be an FHF 1146 I think you are right.
There is a spring new at Cousinesuk you could try out.

[mention]HSL [/mention] That’s probably the closest match I’ve seen yet. Either the FHF 1144 or 1146. Probably an earlier version of one of them as both plate sides differ slightly from mine. Thanks for pointing this out. Appreciated.


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