Jump to content

Worth Restoring ?


jnash

Recommended Posts

Hey Geo, thats a stunnner, i like the first sentence, man of my own heart.  i have the 7a28 model, im not a seiko guy but like i said it looks great.

 

Is there any way i can find out the age of my one as if its 84 like yours i will be even more happier (birth watch !)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scrap that, just reread, I'll try and save the pusher clips but I can't put the back the plate in as its the dial, I'll try and clean that up with a fibre bush maybe . keep you posted. I'm assuming the pusher clips are too far gone and will need replacement but I'll try anyway.. Off to tesco!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just used baking soda, it took the edge off, see below

be8c1dcce2b56ed95e843aa822162da5.jpg

Then I progressed to l&r rust remover which made a dent too :)

59028a2931fcdeac028d6bbcac086eaf.jpg

Not bad, going to polish up the pushers see if I can salvage, thanks for the help, now onto getting the movement to function correctly!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm also wondering if there is any equivalent movement to the 7a28? Being Seiko, I've found lots of their cases each accept a few of their movement offerings...

Hi Bob, the 7a28 is an absolute cracker of a movement with great history. It was the first analogue quartz chronograph, and is well worth restoring from a historic point of view. In my view it would be sacrilege to fit anything else into the case.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Will do, polishing up the pusher clips after the rust removal this morning and continuing with the clean and build. I need to replace the glass and the gasket for the bezel. Do you know what the numbers are for these or will generics do? Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Geo and jnash. As a restorer myself, I agree wholeheartedly.

 

Still the curiosity persists and hope the question is valid considering some cases are more compatible than others. I've seen "non working samples" of beautiful watches (everything included except the movement) but the original movement is not in production anymore and not worth buying used (for restoration). if I want to still get the watch to work I may need to find an alternative.

 

Also, I'm trying to put together some sort of "database" for movement interchangeability. Again, just to feed my curiosity not just of this fact but of  how the industry approaches new designs, tooling, etc...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear that, its a right pain. As for the crystal, all the info you need is here: http://www.thewatchsite.com/21-japanese-watch-discussion-forum/35635-7a28-7039-crystal-replacement.html As for crystal gasket (nylon?) they are hens teeth on older Seikos, the part number is 86566600 and was used on 7A28-7030/ 703A/ 703B as well, try to use the one you have. If you do use a generic gasket you will probably have to use a slightly smaller crystal, as the generic gaskets are generally thicker. I have used a generic gasket on a 7002 diver with the slightly smaller 7S26 crystal and it fits well but its not been pressure tested.

 

Nice work so far, looking forward to seeing the finished item.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks blacklab,

I think i can get away with the crystal gasket, so i need to get my hands on a replacement glass and the gasket that attaches the bezel to the case. had a look at the cousins site but bit confused with the seikos, is there anywhere else in the uk that will have the stuff if they dont?

Thanks

Jonathan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The bezel gasket (part number 8656.7680) are even rarer - can you post a pic we may be able to come up with an alternative. As for the crystal a 31.5x1.5mm flat round is supposed to fit and normally cost between £1-2. Try fleabay.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Saltire, It could be that the screw holding the lever in place isn't tight enough. If you can't tighten it any more then an additional washer should help. I have attached a photo of a silence lever from an Enfield that I have started working on. This one had two washers in place already.
    • Thanks everyone. I'll make sure I get a torch that is hot enough (probably propane) and give it a try next weekend.
    • I have a cheap version of this been using it for nearly 3 years now.  Works fine, i sometimes reshape the fork and when i past reworking i fit another fork insert. I try to save the pennies with cheap general tools  that add up to the pounds for the real goodies.  Everything takes time Michael, you take it steady. Bet you cant wait to start setting up, I have a new room planned its been on the gonna list for ages. One day . Watch the recip saw and fibreglass spells ,  a grinder does the job but you will get covered in fine fibreglass dust if thats what the tub is made of. 
    • Hi everyone, I have an enfield mantle clock where I can't get the silence lever to stay in the silent position, the first three images show the positions of chime, silent (when held), then the silent position when released. Is there something missing that helps it stay in the silent position? Are the marks of 12 & 49 the pendulum length and year? There is a stamp inside the case, is this original or a device / repair date? Any help much appreciated, thanks
    • Hi everyone! Hope you're all keeping well. I'm working on an old Chronosport Chronograph with an Ebauches Bettlach (EB) 8371-67 and broke the lower pusher's rod and leaving the other half still screwed on to the button pusher.  I was able to unscrew the upper button albeit with a little resistance perhaps glued by the previous watch repairer. However, for this lower one, the rod just wouldn't budge. I've soaked the button in Acetone in the hopes of melting the glue and it still wouldn't move. Blasted it hot with a hairdryer, touched it with a soldering iron and still no go. As you can see on the photos below, the pusher is flat on one spot due to my holding it with a vise grip, yes, that's right. Vise grip. I was desperate see. Twisting and turning both the rod and button resulted in nothing. I did, however, successfully bent the rod. So, further trying to correct the bend the next day, I ended up snapping the whole thing in two. So, I'm wondering what my options are and if someone can give guidance: Replace the rod. Where to get the replacement rod then how to remove the broken stump? If removing the stump, how and with what? Replace the whole set of pushers, ie the upper and lower buttons. If replacing, will generic parts do and where to acquire them. Any advice or solution given is very much appreciated. Thanks in advance. Jesse   Chronosport c1970s Pictures of the same button. Note the stump and flattened button. This picture is the other pusher. Disassembled with no issues. Note the melted gasket.
×
×
  • Create New...