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EatPeach

How to lubricate rub-in jewel if I dont have an automatic oiller?

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The rub-in jewels in question are those with a cap jewel held by friction or some kind of claws to secure it, no easy way to take the cap jewel out. I know the easiest way to lubricate it is just use a automatic oiller. Is there any method to oil it if I dont get an automatic oiller? Thank you!

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are these following proposals work?
1. I oil the pivot instead of cap jewel
2.Use a normal oiller just like the automatic oiller. After that I use rodico to wipe out any excess oil left on the jewel face.

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I think a picture of how the cap jewels are seated would help to answer your question, the closest "held in by claws" my imagination can spit out is the shockresist which is held in place by screws. 
I throw in a couple of pictures so you can see if it is the type you try to describe.

 

UPPER.thumb.jpg.089ef86ab9cd1c8403bd1ed313680d65.jpg

 

LOWER.thumb.jpg.b650b8dd95f2dfb96bfef5059a970564.jpg

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Oiling these types of jewels is not much different to modern shock resist jewels - mostly just a case of dealing with screws rather than unhooking a shock spring (though some are rotated to release them, don't have screws - you can tell if there's a little cutout in the edge holding them).

These jewels will need to be cleaned as any regular shock resist jewels would - in so much as they need to be separated from each other so that the cleaning liquid can get inside them effectively. If practical it's worth having a practice with a scrap movement in order to get the feel.

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I think a picture of how the cap jewels are seated would help to answer your question, the closest "held in by claws" my imagination can spit out is the shockresist which is held in place by screws. 
I throw in a couple of pictures so you can see if it is the type you try to describe.
 
UPPER.thumb.jpg.089ef86ab9cd1c8403bd1ed313680d65.jpg
 
LOWER.thumb.jpg.b650b8dd95f2dfb96bfef5059a970564.jpg

something like that but it doesn't have anything screw to release it. It's the jewel of train of wheels,not balance

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Oiling these types of jewels is not much different to modern shock resist jewels - mostly just a case of dealing with screws rather than unhooking a shock spring (though some are rotated to release them, don't have screws - you can tell if there's a little cutout in the edge holding them).

These jewels will need to be cleaned as any regular shock resist jewels would - in so much as they need to be separated from each other so that the cleaning liquid can get inside them effectively. If practical it's worth having a practice with a scrap movement in order to get the feel.

Well. It seems it can not be take out unless you have a jewelling machine. That's why I'm asking

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3 hours ago, EatPeach said:

something like that but it doesn't have anything screw to release it. It's the jewel of train of wheels,not balance

Okay then you have a rub in jewel and then @JohnR725 provided you with an excellent picture.
The tools fpr the trade to be successful depends of the size of the pivot hole.
I use an modified Red oiler or a super fine cap jewel oiler.

For a good result on those ones you need to have a good pegwood to clean it out with first.
My tools for the trade when not using an automatic oiler.
Oilers.thumb.jpg.7fce7691237ce5a858814918202e917e.jpg

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

I'm attaching a couple of images that show how to do it and how not to do it. Do not rely on the pivot that goes into the hole to get the oil to Flow. Ideally want something that's really in much smaller than the hole itself..

oiling if cannot be removed.JPG

do not oiling.JPG

Thank you! this is useful. May I ask which book is it?

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2 minutes ago, HSL said:

Okay then you have a rub in jewel and then @JohnR725 provided you with an excellent picture.
The tools fpr the trade to be successful depends of the size of the pivot hole.
I use an modified Red oiler or a super fine cap jewel oiler.

For a good result on those ones you need to have a good pegwood to clean it out with first.
My tools for the trade when not using an automatic oiler.
Oilers.thumb.jpg.7fce7691237ce5a858814918202e917e.jpg

yes this is what I'm thinking now and just trying to sharpening an old oiler. I would probably choose the black bergeon since it's more rigid than the red one.

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24 minutes ago, mikepilk said:

I made a tool by gluing an old broken balance staff in to a bit of brass tube.

I find it useful for those annoying little Seiko Diafix jewels.

20200704_124452.thumb.jpg.70d6f161290113e43e4a37aa0ba40e1c.jpg

You're definitely right. Those diafix jewels are very easily flying away. Use some scrap to make this is a very good idea.

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