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Hi watch and clockmakers,

May I ask for your thoughts about the glue shall be used to fix the crown to the stem? I did my initial research and many mentions loctite, but i found none of the ppl who actually said which loctite. When it was mentioned on this forum loctite 638 it was also stated that probably not ideal. Even in Mark's video loctite was just mentioned as loctite. Is it obvious as which one? As far as I understand it has to be strong enough so the crown would not come off and weak enough to be able to remove the crown? I guess the latter only matters with special crowns not the ones you can buy for 10p, or when you cannot easily replace the stem/crown with vintage watches as they are not available for purchase? Would this one do? loctite I guess many would use something else than loctite.

Take care and my bestregards,

Lui

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Hi watch and clockmakers,
May I ask for your thoughts about the glue shall be used to fix the crown to the stem? I did my initial research and many mentions loctite, but i found none of the ppl who actually said which loctite. When it was mentioned on this forum loctite 638 it was also stated that probably not ideal. Even in Mark's video loctite was just mentioned as loctite. Is it obvious as which one? As far as I understand it has to be strong enough so the crown would not come off and weak enough to be able to remove the crown? I guess the latter only matters with special crowns not the ones you can buy for 10p, or when you cannot easily replace the stem/crown with vintage watches as they are not available for purchase? Would this one do? : loctite I guess many would use something else than loctite.
Take care and my bestregards,
Lui

I use no loctite for pocket watch crowns and stems as the threads are big enough to have a good grip. For watches, the blue medium should do. Any other thoughts out there?


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Loctite blue seems to be the most favourite by watch repairers. I never ever used any type of glue. If the button came away from the stem, it would be the inside thread in the button had worn, or some wear to the thread of the stem or both. So I would replace, what ever was needed. 

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I personally have had good experiences with the purple Loctite 222.  Its described as low adhesive and for fasteners that require occasional adjustment so its easy to loosen if all of a sudden the crown would need to be removed.

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9 minutes ago, Stevelp said:

I personally have had good experiences with the purple Loctite 222.  Its described as low adhesive and for fasteners that require occasional adjustment so its easy to loosen if all of a sudden the crown would need to be removed.

Yeah that's what I have and indeed is weak so to suggest that faith is also required for it to hold.

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I use 243 which is fairly weak. However, I picked up a pritt-stick style Loctite which is much easier to apply than the liquid, so will start trying that. 
When I can't put my hands on the 222 I use 243 hahaha. Just don't use 638/648, you'll need a torch to get it loose.
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(Going off topic slightly, but I’ll post this while I remember): Someone asked me yesterday which was the BHI-recommended Loctite for securing clock wheel collets to arbors which is 603 (this is when not soldering). 

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