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ChrisL

My Vintage Oyster

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I love a good vintage watch and I was quite happy to get hold of this one. Yes - the dial is a bit shabby and the hands but I don't think I will do anything with that as I think it adds character to the watch - it is vintage after all.

 

I understand that these Oysters were made before Rolex took over - am I wrong? Does anyone have any information in it?

 

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@ChrisL.  From what I was able to find, Oyster is a brand of waterproof watch that was made by Rolex.  It was given the name Oyster by the Rolex company in 1926 because it was the first waterproof watch!  I imagine that a little more research could tell you what year it was made and how old it is!  I don't now that I would trust it for it's waterproof-ness if it were my watch, but that's just ,me being overly paranoid probably.  It's certainly beautiful.

 

 http://www.rolex.com/about-rolex/rolex-history/1926-1947.html

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That is a beautiful watch. Gorgeous warm patina on the dial and original hands....NOT shabby my friend! what is the size of the watch? Any movements pics? I am a nut for the movements....gotta see the MOVEMENT!

 

JC

Edited by noirrac1j

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