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Hi I recently bought this Vostok watch from a collector. 

Does anyone have any literature/history about this watch model , # of jewels, movement type or any other piece of information ?

Thanks in advance

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On 5/24/2020 at 11:54 PM, Rishah said:

Hi I recently bought this Vostok watch from a collector. 

Does anyone have any literature/history about this watch model , # of jewels, movement type or any other piece of information ?

Thanks in advance

IMG_20200524_221646[1].jpg

IMG_20200524_221314[1].jpg

Just Google Vostok 2414A or Wostok 2414A, or 2414

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