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I’ve always been really impressed by the lapping machines that are used to achieve flat faces and crisp on cases. Although I don’t do enough case refinishing to warrant the price of a machine, I though maybe I could achieve a similar result with something home built. The impetus to try came when I bought an Omega Chronostop. The case came with a sunburst case finish that was long gone and would require precise brushing.

 

b16d832fea794475f7f6cf471a810137.jpg

 

I figured I could replicate the multi-axis adjustment by using a telescope head. Found one on eBay for $125. Then added a 3 jaw Chuck for $50. My only issue was that I needed to adapt the two together. Because the stress won’t be so high I figured I could just 3D print some adapters and it worked perfectly! The great thing about the resin printer is that the resolution allowed me to actually print the threading!

 

fe21126fad465174b6360150762ebb5e.jpg

 

9869b7c960c464091c188749e99f6cf9.jpg

 

Because the case is a top loader, there was no good way to hold it properly so I printed an adapter to screw on the back.

 

479436545e9dc105891b3f9d547fb9e5.jpg

 

 

All ready to go:

 

fea3e97456b07bdee6da31e0ab1301f3.jpg

 

I am really happy with the results! The case has some dings that I wish I could laser weld but alas I can’t built one of those on the cheap. Lol.

 

My next step is to find a way to fasten everything down so I get more consistent engagement with the sander and recreate the angles consistently between checking my work.

 

7e40ee64a1e3182417c598126d013c95.jpg

 

 

ebd90dc1f0f7cb13cde9628e2b7a4a27.jpg

 

 

- Craig

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I’ve always been really impressed by the lapping machines that are used to achieve flat faces and crisp on cases. Although I don’t do enough case refinishing to warrant the price of a machine, I though maybe I could achieve a similar result with something home built. The impetus to try came when I bought an Omega Chronostop. The case came with a sunburst case finish that was long gone and would require precise brushing.
 
b16d832fea794475f7f6cf471a810137.jpg&key=0abb212ddcde109e58b045ac9de19ed323f585c0187e7406af5b1d3d5db7c120
 
I figured I could replicate the multi-axis adjustment by using a telescope head. Found one on eBay for $125. Then added a 3 jaw Chuck for $50. My only issue was that I needed to adapt the two together. Because the stress won’t be so high I figured I could just 3D print some adapters and it worked perfectly! The great thing about the resin printer is that the resolution allowed me to actually print the threading!
 
fe21126fad465174b6360150762ebb5e.jpg&key=8f4a5b3a4c7e403b2727c1447afb18f33904d4d378dfac117d947b73a4aa6698
 
9869b7c960c464091c188749e99f6cf9.jpg&key=7902528277c923334fceff7f49cdfee944f3073dba74dfb975f02d4fed78152e
 
Because the case is a top loader, there was no good way to hold it properly so I printed an adapter to screw on the back.
 
479436545e9dc105891b3f9d547fb9e5.jpg&key=ae0ef434276a306b099ba20c4723643a40cac1d94eeb957352ea466f46333143
 
 
All ready to go:
 
fea3e97456b07bdee6da31e0ab1301f3.jpg&key=16fdd4d1159fcf7621e89700da43fdf840361d37fa623206fc6b59238498f364
 
I am really happy with the results! The case has some dings that I wish I could laser weld but alas I can’t built one of those on the cheap. Lol.
 
My next step is to find a way to fasten everything down so I get more consistent engagement with the sander and recreate the angles consistently between checking my work.
 
7e40ee64a1e3182417c598126d013c95.jpg&key=4ab541031e578979722c82977171d3e6eaae3b677b6a6295085c1c9364237d3e
 
 
ebd90dc1f0f7cb13cde9628e2b7a4a27.jpg&key=c6ccf1f93745c83fe6fbf1dd09bfcc32c34b728c7abbcabf2ec59a4b83d15a8f
 
 
- Craig


Nice Idea, can you please post the ebay link to the telescope head.
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On 5/21/2020 at 2:57 AM, Narcissus said:

Then added a 3 jaw Chuck for $50. 

Nitpick, the market price for that type of chuck is a little more than $30 shipped. Alos interesting the below for $22, from the jaws casting marks it appears they are of a softer alloy, which is good to preserve the finishing of the work.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000276565113.html

 

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