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1967 Timex 600 ft Skin Diver - Before and After


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When I spotted this watch listed on eBay my first thought was what is going on with the crown. Its all wrong and I'm sure there is going to be signs of water damage inside.

It did not disappoint there but the end result turned out great.

Before

That is just what I found and did end up replacing  the movement .  I began with a breakdown and inspection. 

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Movement has seen better days and not worth the effort. So it gets replaced.

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Now the cosmetics -  

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and there it is on the left along with the other 600 ft divers.

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27 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Well done Mo another saved from the grim reaper.

yes but, this one did spend some time in purgatory !!  What I liked the most from this project is how nice the hands came out. I mixed white and yellow nail polish to match the tone of the hour marks.

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  • 3 months later...

Hi guys.  I'm new to the forum.   I love these vintage Timex divers.   I've got one from 1970 that's the 200 ft version.   I'm trying to figure out how to repaint and fill in a hand that the lume/paint has crumbled off over the years.   I read where jerseymo used nail polish.   Does that actually fill the void created by the decayed lume or do you have to add anything else to give it some structure?   Thanks in advance for any knowledge you can send my way.   Take care 

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8 hours ago, billings389 said:

   Does that actually fill the void created by the decayed lume or do you have to add anything else to give it some structure?  

yes, it works as you can see it was used in this project.  The gap on the diver hands are larger than most so the process may take more than one application. You must also take care not to lay on to much at once.  This is true no matter which material you use to relume with.

Edited by JerseyMo
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On 9/4/2020 at 10:10 AM, billings389 said:

Hi guys.  I'm new to the forum.   I love these vintage Timex divers.   I've got one from 1970 that's the 200 ft version.   I'm trying to figure out how to repaint and fill in a hand that the lume/paint has crumbled off over the years.   I read where jerseymo what watch does trump wear used nail polish.   Does that actually fill the void created by the decayed lume or do you have to add anything else to give it some structure?   Thanks in advance for any knowledge you can send my way.   Take care 

i have also got the same watch form one of an online store, they also offer to paint your watches and other maintenance,  you are always welcome!

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  • 1 month later...

I'm no expert in this matter but I think with the quantities involved, the risk should be minimal.

As long as common sense is used. Don't flick the old lume off and create a radium cloud. I put a drop to glycerine on the hands to entrap all the particles that may fly off. Work on a clean table top with no clutter. Spread old newspaper if you are really worried.

The question is how do you dispose of the rubbish after that? Do you call your local radioactive waste contractor? Do you dump it in your general rubbish? 

Shhhh.... ?

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Of course it is still up to the individual to decide  but, I usually reply not to "Lick" the dial.  From the many times I've seen this question asked the general replies are there is more radioactivity surrounding you each day than there is on the typical dial.  So don't be concerned.  Even on of biggest horological foes with whom I had many intellectual dialogues with ( a nice way to say we butted heads) actually agreed with me on this one!  So I offer you what I have to others. "You get in a Timex 600 ft diver and I'll gladly hold on to it for you until the half life of the radium has halved!"  Just some northern New Jersey humor there! "What you got a problem with that?"   see I did it again.

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Wear gloves, which is a good idea anyway, to keep fingerprints off the parts.

Maybe wear a mask?

You have a better chance of being struck by lightning, right after collecting your lottery winnings, than having a health issue attributable to the material applied to a watch dial 60 years ago...

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  • 3 months later...
On 10/19/2020 at 7:32 PM, JerseyMo said:

Of course it is still up to the individual to decide  but, I usually reply not to "Lick" the dial.  From the many times I've seen this question asked the general replies are there is more radioactivity surrounding you each day than there is on the typical dial.  So don't be concerned.  Even on of biggest horological foes with whom I had many intellectual dialogues with ( a nice way to say we butted heads) actually agreed with me on this one!  So I offer you what I have to others. "You get in a Timex 600 ft diver and I'll gladly hold on to it for you until the half life of the radium has halved!"  Just some northern New Jersey humor there! "What you got a problem with that?"   see I did it again.

I'm sorry, but I could not help but correct your spelling. the correct spelling is,"You gat a problem wit dat?" Unless you are from the NW part of the state, but in that case, you might not be able to operate an internet. LOL ONLY KIDDING.

A serious question for a new watch fettler who fondly remembers his very first watch, a Timex.

Are working replacement movements for these watches reasonably available? It seems like it would be a good entry point for someone who wants to try some restoration work, like you have done, but does not have the skills to tear down a movement and service it.

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1 hour ago, PastorChris said:

I'm sorry, but I could not help but correct your spelling. the correct spelling is,"You gat a problem wit dat?" Unless you are from the NW part of the state, but in that case, you might not be able to operate an internet. LOL ONLY KIDDING.

A serious question for a new watch fettler who fondly remembers his very first watch, a Timex.

Are working replacement movements for these watches reasonably available? It seems like it would be a good entry point for someone who wants to try some restoration work, like you have done, but does not have the skills to tear down a movement and service it.

"Minchia" like a true New Jerseyite you come in with an attitude.  

Vintage Timex parts are only available from leftover stock that may been stored by a watchmaker or repair centers. These parts have made their way to online auction sites, flea markets or other such palces.  So even if you find a replacement movement it has been sitting idle for decades and will need to be serviced anyway.  What separates vintage Timex from the traditional jeweled movements is that they do not have to be fully broken down to be serviced. 

I and many others have posted the how to steps to service a vintage Timex.  There are even a few videos on YouTube. Of course none of these videos were made by me so they are sub par in my opinion.  <<< "just displaying my Jersey attitude there". 

What watch are you working on or thinking of working on? 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, JerseyMo said:

"Minchia" like a true New Jerseyite you come in with an attitude.  

Vintage Timex parts are only available from leftover stock that may been stored by a watchmaker or repair centers. These parts have made their way to online auction sites, flea markets or other such palces.  So even if you find a replacement movement it has been sitting idle for decades and will need to be serviced anyway.  What separates vintage Timex from the traditional jeweled movements is that they do not have to be fully broken down to be serviced. 

I and many others have posted the how to steps to service a vintage Timex.  There are even a few videos on YouTube. Of course none of these videos were made by me so they are sub par in my opinion.  <<< "just displaying my Jersey attitude there". 

What watch are you working on or thinking of working on? 

 

 

I found a few of those threads as I continue to leader my way around the forum!

Nothing in the pipe at the moment, I am kind of in search of my next project. I am getting ready to bite the bullet and make the investment in proper lubes and then that will open things up for some simple moment work. 

I saw a thread here on some old Timex 600 diving watches and trying to find something like that to play with would be fun LOL; maybe a bit of cleaning, polishing, re-luming hands and such then some movement work.

For me it is the search and journey and satisfaction of a job well done rather than looking for another watch to wear.

Edited by PastorChris
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agreed the fun is in knowing you completed the task is the true reward. You don't need much to get started with vintage Timex. Just search eBay for vintage Timex lot and there are plenty to be had.  They do not require any fancy or expensive setup to get started with.  Know that if you get hooked in to the hobby your work area will start to look like this before you can say "Saltpepperketchup" when ordering an egg and cheese with Taylor ham on a Kaiser roll. ?

 

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