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I was trawling the net and found this lot for sale:-

A pre 1970 Bulova Accutron gentleman's battery operated wristwatch, circular champagne dial with date aperture, on an expandable bracelet, a Rotary gentleman's gold plated wristwatch, circa 2002, the rectangular dial bearing Roman numerals, both boxed with certification a Ronson lighter, and a compact. (4)  Est £60 - 80.

 

post-197-0-30777200-1422264569_thumb.jpg

 

Now the question will be will the gamble pay off as the charges from the saleroom plus postage go on top.

I decided to have a punt at the lower end and got the lot for £60, plus charges and post  brings it to £88.80. However both watches come with boxes and certification.  The Accutron easily covers the total charge ( if I can bear to part with it ) and the Rotary does not look too bad which is a bonus.  I am banking on the fact that the owner kept the Boxes and certification as someone that does take that sort of care may have looked after their watches.

 

I remember my father having one of those lighters which were really common in the day but heaven knows what I will do with a womans compact - hold back on the comments George.

 

Off to hospital shortly today for my pacemaker replacement op, as a bit like the Accutrons my battery has died - hope i don't need rephasing :D , but on my return I will eagerly await my parcel.

 

Cheers,

 

Vic

 

 

 

 

 

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Like you, as soon as I saw the lighter I thought of my dad too. If you really are off to get your pacemaker re-charged my best wishes go with you.

Just a thought Vic, could you get it re-mapped like a car? If so you might give Usain Bolt a run for his money! :)

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Hello Chaps,

 

Hello Chaps,

 

Its a bit like the boy that cried wolf as I am always joking about it but I go to hospital for the op at 1.30.  Unfortunately they dont recharge or replace batteries, the whole unit has to come out (except for the wires hopefully) and it gets replaced with a new one.  It should be in and out the same day - I may not be doing much until it heals and the stitches come out.  Unfortunately I did not manage to make time to put the carriage clock together but that will be manageable.

 

I will get more info on the compact Will and advise you, as I did actually win the whole lot for £60.00.

 

Not that keen on Rotary watches after seeing inside a few of the more modern ones, however, it does not look like quartz at least its not shown on the face and it may be ok, the advert says Circa 2002. I will have the backs off and see what they are like when I get them.  I am quite excited about the Accutron.

 

Cheers,

 

Vic

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Thanks for the kind words chaps.

 

I am a tad sore but I managed to get them to let me come home after the op, which was good as it was shaping up to be an overnight stay.  So I have a brand new pacemaker implanted that should be good for another 6 to 8 years. but am at home and once the stitches heal up all will be well.

 

Cheers and thanks to all,

 

Vic

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Treatment is fun, isn't it. I remember when I went for my "snip" (guess where) many years ago, I walked into the Reception area in the specialist clinic where it was to be carried out. There were two middle-aged ladies behind the desk. One of them looked up, smiled sweetly and said, "Take a seat - the doctor will be here with two bricks in just a moment or two".

 

When I was on the table, before the local anaesthetic was applied (DON'T ask!), the orderly was painting me bits yellow. When I asked him, like a fool, what the yellow paint was for, he said, "That's so people won't park on you..."

Edited by WillFly
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Treatment is fun, isn't it. I remember when I went for my "snip" (guess where) many years ago, I walked into the Reception area in the specialist clinic where it was to be carried out. There were two middle-aged ladies behind the desk. One of them looked up, smiled sweetly and said, "Take a seat - the doctor will be here with two bricks in just a moment or two".

 

When I was on the table, before the local anaesthetic was applied (DON'T ask!), the orderly was painting me bits yellow. When I asked him, like a fool, what the yellow paint was for, he said, "That's so people won't park on you..."

After I bet you could do a good John Wayne impression :D

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Please don't, it hurts when I laugh.

 

My Bro in law went private to Bupa for his snip which cost him dearly as he ended up with what resembled two small melons between his legs when some infection set in.  I was NHS and was in and walking out in 2 hours with no bother at all - oh the irony. :sword:

Cheers,

 

Vic

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  • 1 month later...

Actually got the lighter working. Had to drill out the old Flint and corrosion, put a new wheel in and change the valve but it works perfectly.

post-197-0-55022700-1426205491_thumb.jpg

So good it even works upside down (;-))

Cheers,

Vic

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When I filled it with gas and checked it in a bowl of water there was a constant stream of bubbles coming from the filler valve. I got a new replacement valve and when I removed the old valve the seals were shot which is why it leaked. Incidentally the new valve was supplied with a tool for removal and insertion. Pleased to have one like my dads old one, it will probably just sit on my desk though but still nice to have.

Cheers,

Vic

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As a curiosity Vic, are those valves readily available? Are they standard for all lighters or do they have different sizes? I collect lighters (mostly fuel Zippos) and some use gas but they are old, so I figure I'd better be prepared!

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Apparently for the varalames (Ronson Varaflame MK2 Snuffless ) like mine there can be two sorts of valve type A or B. I think that type A fits into a brass collet rather than the lighter body like the B and both are readily available on the bay. My zippo lighters are all petrol type and I know that you can buy service kits for zippo to replace the felt, wick and wool. You can also buy the full inserts quite reasonably priced butI don't know if you could butcher them for the parts, I suspect you could.

Have a look on the bay for: ZIPPO REPLACEMENT INSERT - CHROME - GENUINE ORIGINAL SERVICE PART - NEW & UNUSED or ZIPPO REPLACEMENT INSERT - BRASS - GENUINE ORIGINAL SERVICE PART - NEW & UNUSED. I would think that there must be other collectors or specialist services for vintage zippos as they have been around since the thirties.

Cheers,

Vic

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