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Nice 23 Jewel Russian Sekonda Bought From The Bay..

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Hi all,

I took a punt at the last minute on this 23 Jewel Russian Luch Sekonda last week on the Bay, I took a chance on it because I thought it was one of the scarcer Blue Dials that had been put in a gold plated case, but did not have enough time to read the listing until after :biggrin: when the listing stated a Black Dial I was slightly disapointed. Anyway after reminding myself to always read a listing before bidding, I looked forward to receiving the watch, so I could get to work on it. I thought I would share some photos of the process with you all..

It did not turn out too bad at all

Best Wishes to you all

Darren

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Many Thanks Guys

Judging by the 1st photo I was hoping it was the crystal that was damaged and not the dial, I was quite relieved when I received and checked it and found the dial to be in great condition

another one saved from scrapheap...

Many Thanks Guys

Best Wishes

Darren

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That's a very tidy job and a fantastic restoration.

 

I love the apparent excess of intermediate wheels between the crown wheel and the ratchet wheel and wonder what the rationale behind it is. I have come across it on other Soviet watches (most recently a Slava 2414) which have had two mainsprings and barrels, but this one seems to have only one. The arrangement doesn't even change the direction of rotation of the crown relative to the ratchet wheel.

 

A top notch result anyway.

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Hi Marc

Many Thanks..

The arrangement of the intermediate wheels has to follow that order as well, they don't fit any other way
there is also two extra wheels under the train bridge thus making 5 wheels in total, the Soviets have some really interesting
movements with some great design features yet also some of their ideas for their movements seen to be based on a Fri afternoon thought :)

 

I am just cleaning another one now and have another following in the post, should be here next week... :P

 

 

Many Thanks and Best Wishes

 

 

Darren

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Very nice work! When I saw your first photo, I too was worried about what looked like dial damage.

 

Regarding the extra wheels, perhaps the Ministry of Watch Wheels produced too many wheels, so the Ministry of Watch Movements had to design a movement to use them all. Such is Soviet management. :)

Edited by svorkoetter

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Hi Svorkoetter,

Many Thanks for your post...

It was a complete gamble with only a minute to decide, at best I would come out with a great watch at worst some spares for a different restoration fortunately it was the former...

These movements are pretty good to work on but I wonder why Luch opted for the Tri-shock shock system for the 23 jewel rather than the inca in its 19 jewel cousin as well as a fixed stud carrier rather than movable. I think this model could pre-date the 19 jewel Raketa...

Best wishes

Darren

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I love the apparent excess of intermediate wheels between the crown wheel and the ratchet wheel and wonder what the rationale behind it is. I have come across it on other Soviet watches (most recently a Slava 2414) which have had two mainsprings and barrels, but this one seems to have only one. The arrangement doesn't even change the direction of rotation of the crown relative to the ratchet wheel.

2 barrels usually give increased power reserve or more leveled torque or flexibility in components arrangement or combination of thereof. In case of Slava, it is components arrangement. (And, maybe torque, but i don't know about that in Slava's case.) Certainly not power reserve: Slava movements have 31-40 hour, depending on movement.

 

The arrangement of the intermediate wheels has to follow that order as well, they don't fit any other way...

Yes, they don't. 2209 was Soviet thin watch. From ranfft.de: "With an intermediate wheel between minute pinion and a separate minute wheel the complete train is moved from the center to the periphery. And due to the indirect sweep second, there is also no second wheel in the center. Thus neither balance nor barrel is overlapped by any wheel, and the complete height is available for barrel and balance. The result is a rather low profile without reducing sturdiness or accuracy."

 

... but I wonder why Luch opted for the Tri-shock shock system for the 23 jewel rather than the inca in its 19 jewel cousin as well as a fixed stud carrier rather than movable. I think this model could pre-date the 19 jewel Raketa...

Mobile stud carrier was later development. (And different balance ring.) Your movement is pre 1983. They were made since 1961.

 

Can't comment on Tri-shock vs Incablock question. Or on relationship of Raketa and Luch.

 

Denis

 

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That's a fantastic explanation Thanks very much for that Denis

I now know who to seek out if I have any questions/problems with Soviet made movements

My thanks and Best Wishes

Darren

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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