Jump to content
  • 0
JJM

How do I replace the seal

Question

10 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

That is almost impossible. Can be done by removing the thin washer. But it's hard to put it back again. Can maybe be done like this. https://adventuresinamateurwatchfettling.com/2015/10/12/crown-revival-seiko-6105-and-62mas-crown-gasket-replacement/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
9 minutes ago, rogart63 said:

That is almost impossible. Can be done by removing the thin washer. But it's hard to put it back again. Can maybe be done like this. https://adventuresinamateurwatchfettling.com/2015/10/12/crown-revival-seiko-6105-and-62mas-crown-gasket-replacement/

This is how I do them, except I don't try to save the cap, I just get it out and make a new one. But that fellow's technique is really good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
12 minutes ago, nickelsilver said:

This is how I do them, except I don't try to save the cap, I just get it out and make a new one. But that fellow's technique is really good!

Ahhhhh....... Umm the rubber does have some give left in it.... I think I may just grease it & leave it there... Shame, I was getting all keen... 

Thanks Chaps ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
3 hours ago, JJM said:

Not too sure how to approach replacing this.... 

I've always managed to remove these without breaking anything. I use a dental pick, it doesn't have the ideal shape I have found anything better so far.

50 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

Just replace the complete button. They are called water proof buttons. 

That's OK with cheapies where originality is not important. But in most cases actually in which the presence of a logo, or the material, size and shape make so that a generic replacement is out of question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By Trevelyan
      Hi, new to repairing, just getting my feet wet, so be prepared for me to use incorrect language, and have things explained like I'm 5 :)
      A couple years ago, I purchased a Seiko Sportsmatic Weekdater, cal. 6619-7050. 
      Soon after purchase, the crown detached from the stem, and I took it in to local watchmaker for repair. It was returned in apparently good shape, but actually the problem still exists. 
      I'd like to learn how to fix the problem, and hopefully bring this watch back to my wrist. 
      It appears that the crown screws onto the stem, but that is as far as I have got. 
      Any assistance would be welcomed. I did find a service manual elsewhere, but I'm a bit lost as it's my first. 


      Seiko Sportmatic 6619A.pdf
    • By Furqan
      Hello Everyone.
      I need some help with repairing my Emporio Armani ar-1922.
      I've watched some videos on YouTube but none of them resemble the movement of this particular watch.
      My first problem is removing the stem/crown. I cannot see anything which looks like it will release the stem and I don't want to poke around inside it any more for fear of creating any damage.
      Any help will be much appreciated.
      Thanks.


    • By Joshua
      Hey, so I have a question. I've got an Invicta dive watch with a NH35A movement here that whenever I unthread the stem and crown as it is unthreading the date starts changing. Once its unthreaded I can change it to the 1, 2 and 3 positions and set and wind it accordingly. How can I fix this and what is causing this? 
       
      Yours truly, Josh
    • By Lorenz
      Hey guys, my name is Lorenz. I am an 18 year old electrical engineering student from Germany. 
      I got this Breitling chronospace a56012.1 from my granddad and I want to repair it.
      Besides a slight clicking noise while turning the crown ( someone please let me know if this is normal ) it works just fine.
      My main problem is that the black color on the Bezel is worn out on some positions and I dont know where to find a paint that holds on the metal nor do I know how to paint it again.
      I have worked with watches already, I disassembled a mechanical movement cleaned and oiled it again so I feel pretty confident in doing this job.
      And I would also like to change out the crystal, does anyone know what size crystal I need for this watch?
      Thanks in regards for any advice.

    • By rduckwor
      Early 60's Elgin 10K Shockmaster. I suppose one of their attempts at water proofing a watch (see the crystal and gasket in the second picture). The question is how to get the crown off (Its wobbly when pulled out to the set position and I am certain it contains a gasket) so I can remove the movement? Dis-assemble the keyless works in place so I can grab the stem and unscrew the crown?? Thanks.


  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • If you are all in the mood for a little bit of Soviet era horology, then I'd like to introduce today's 404 club fixer upper. A Raketa 2609.HA based Sekonda, complete with the obligatory USSR marking on the bottom of the dial.  The gold plated  case (stamped AU9) and the near indestructible Raketa movement make these little Sekondas rather pleasing and rewarding  pieces to resurrect.  I think it too enjoyed its well earned service and good scrub down, as it is now sitting at >270 degrees, beat error around 0.1ms and somewhere around +30 sec per day without me adjusting anything. It is still sporting the original high dome crystal, which took a good polish and save for a few tiny blemishes looks almost new One other great thing about these (I have a couple of similar examples) is the dial. It is both easily readable, and classically elegant at the same time. A station clock for the wrist. Maybe the 1970s weren't completely devoid of taste after all.  
    • I cleaned it by soaking in Home Depot naptha and pegging by hand, 2 rinses. Demagnetized the whole thing, as well. I'll dig back in with both suggestions and report back any findings. Enjoying the process.
    • also;  there several books on the internet on that subject.  good luck.  vin
    • Always hard so make a guess... Anyway, I think the problem is on the dial side, i.e. the dial train (cannon pinion, minute wheel, hour wheel, intermediate wheel). Could it be that the clutch wheel doesn't disengage properly from the intermediate wheel that drives the minute wheel when you set the time? If so the intermediate wheel may bind up the minute wheel making things slow down and then stop. Well, just guessing. Anyway, I'd check the dial train (motion works) and the keyless works. I think your idea of removing the cannon pinion to see if it solves the problem is a good idea. If it doesn't help you'll know for sure the problem is with the train of wheels or the escapement. Good luck and let us know of any progress or any new observations.
    • This was really fascinating, but I couldn’t hear sound, do I have a fault at my end? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
×
×
  • Create New...