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sjhilbel

Seiko 5 7S26B... sigh

Question

My latest project is a Seiko 5 with a 7S26B. First, I could tell this was going to be a real fixer upper when the pallet fork stuck to the bridge from too much oil. I now have to find out what size screwdriver to use on the one sole phillips/cross screw under the calendar wheel. However, after looking closer at it, it is stripped.

So, I need to know what size screwdriver to get for this one solitary screw and what to do with a stripped screw.

Thank you for you help on advance.

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4 screws (3x A type and 1x B type). First we will unscrew one B type screw, part number 0016 705. It is a phillips head screw. (Another unorthodox component!). To be able to remove this screw, we would have to make a tool - a "half phillips head screwdriver". :-)

 

Seiko 7s26 diy disassembly - date indicator maintaining plate

Place a sheet of medium coarse (400 or 600 grade) sand paper on to a flat surface and shape the blade of your smallest size screwdriver (40 or 60 / 0.40 or 0.60mm) as per photo.

 

Seiko DIY 7S26 - 40 or 60 screwdriver

DIY Seiko 7S26 - 0.40mm or 0.60mm screwdriver

Seiko 7S26 Date Plate screw A

Seiko Date Plate screw A

Seiko 7S26 Date Plate

Seiko Date Plate screw A

Hi there hope this helps. Hopefully you will get enough traction to remove the screw.....:)

 

Edited by Graziano

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4 hours ago, sjhilbel said:

Graziano, this is great! I’ve been search for this special screwdriver all day, when I could have been making my own. I’m still a watch repair noob so I’m still learning these tricks. Thank you!

All good take care 

 

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That's a nifty trick @Graziano and the illustrations are just brilliant! Thank you! Anyway, Cousinsuk.com have this SEIKO S-921 screwdriver in case you don't want to make your own tool.

Did you make your illustrations to answer this question in particular or are your pictures from a walkthrough? In the latter case could you provide a link?

 

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28 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

That's a nifty trick @Graziano and the illustrations are just brilliant! Thank you! Anyway, Cousinsuk.com have this SEIKO S-921 screwdriver in case you don't want to make your own tool.

Did you make your illustrations to answer this question in particular or are your pictures from a walkthrough? In the latter case could you provide a link?

 

This is great info enjoy https://www.clockmaker.com.au/diy_seiko_7s26/

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1 hour ago, Graziano said:

With all the due respect, I do not agree that the above is that great, or even that should be given as an example all the time.
For one, is incomplete, ending with train is placed together. And some practices are debatable, for example the one of opening the barrel and fitting the mainspring without a winder.
I recommend the OP to look instead at the video below by hour Host Mark Lovick. He also made some more about the same mov't. Even better would be to enroll in his training,

watchrepairlessons.com

 

 

Edited by jdm

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52 minutes ago, jdm said:

With all the due respect, I do not agree that the above is that great, or even that should be given as an example. For one, is incomplete, ending even with the train is placed together. The, some practices are debatable, for example the one of opening the barrel and fitting the mainspring without a winder. I recommend the OP to look instead at the video below by hour Host Mark Lovick. He also made some more abput the sam mov't. Even better would be to enroll in training, watchrepairlessons.com

 

The original post was about the screw driver required for 0016 705 screw ,this method of filing down works for burred screws as you can work the screwdriver to fit the stripped head enough to get traction in most cases works for me ,enjoy I don't see your problem :jig:

Edited by Graziano

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Reading the following on the SEIKO DIY site Graziano linked to was a bit of a turn off:

"If you are just an amateur horologist or hobbyist, then it is highly unethical, unprofessional and most likely illegal to repair other people's watches - even if they want you to do so."

Being exactly that, "just a hobbyist", it feels like a pretty condescending statement, especially as it's given without any kind of explanation.

Anyway, I really enjoyed how thoroughly he goes through what the various SEIKO numbers mean, and I'm sure I'll have more to learn from that site, so much appreciated Graziano. I'll consider it a complement to @Mark's excellent 7s26 videos on his YT channel.

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11 minutes ago, Graziano said:

The original post was about the screw driver required for 0016 705 screw

I think you misunderstood the scope of my comment. I have no quibble about that detail, but expressed my general opinion about the 7S26 articles by Mr. Hacko.

Again to help the OP, without even leaving this forum there is plenty of detailed photographic information on  the very popular mov't.

 

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47 minutes ago, aac58 said:

I use a 1,2 mm phillips screwdriver from a very cheap chinese set and it works just fine for that screw. A 1.0 mm will likely work too.

The original post was about a stripped screw ,the method shown above allows you to work the screwdriver with the sandpaper so that you ca get traction on a stripped screw ,Maybe I should of made myself clearer 

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Just now, jdm said:

I think you misunderstood the scope of my comment. I have no quibble about that detail, but expressed my general opinion about the 7S26 articles by Mr. Hacko.

Again to help the OP, without even leaving this forum there is plenty of detailed photographic information on  the very popular mov't.

 

I agree with you Mr jdm I was just showing the op a way of shaping the screwdriver to undo a stripped date plate screw that will allow traction enough to undo the screw ,most of the time it works .Thanks

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22 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Reading the following on the SEIKO DIY site Graziano linked to was a bit of a turn off:

"If you are just an amateur horologist or hobbyist, then it is highly unethical, unprofessional and most likely illegal to repair other people's watches - even if they want you to do so."

Being exactly that, "just a hobbyist", it feels like a pretty condescending statement, especially as it's given without any kind of explanation.

Anyway, I really enjoyed how thoroughly he goes through what the various SEIKO numbers mean, and I'm sure I'll have more to learn from that site, so much appreciated Graziano. I'll consider it a complement to @Mark's excellent 7s26 videos on his YT channel.

Hi VWatchie , thank you for your comments but don't take it to heart I'm sure that some of the remarks that are written there are only there to protect their own investment and for legal reasons .I agree with you Mr VWatchie that Marks videos are far more informative and he has respect for the hobbiest . Thanks

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Thank you to everyone. @Graziano provided a great way to remove the stripped screw. I appreciate @VWatchie link to the specific Seiko driver. I am also grateful for the attention to detail and professional guidance everyone provides. As a beginner, I want to do repairs well and properly. I am following @Mark’s 7S26 closely for this repair. I’ve found myself searching for the same watches he repairs and records in order to learn.

Again, thank you, everyone.

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2 minutes ago, sjhilbel said:

Thank you to everyone. @Graziano provided a great way to remove the stripped screw. I appreciate @VWatchie link to the specific Seiko driver. I am also grateful for the attention to detail and professional guidance everyone provides. As a beginner, I want to do repairs well and properly. I am following @Mark’s 7S26 closely for this repair. I’ve found myself searching for the same watches he repairs and records in order to learn.

Again, thank you, everyone.

That's awesome :thumbsu:

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On 3/22/2020 at 1:04 PM, sjhilbel said:

I’ve found myself searching for the same watches he repairs and records in order to learn.

I'd say that's a pretty smart move! ^_^

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