Jump to content
  • 0
AP1875

Scuffed my bracelet, how to repair

Question

Hi guys,

ive scuffed my bracelet, no idea how but I’d like to try and salvage it if possible. Can anyone help advise what the process is? On the polished bits I’ve always used cape cod to good effect, not sure how to work on these brushed parts though.

 

31942A3A-293E-4E72-931D-1B4E6A834803.jpeg

AE53B283-3BD4-41F9-9CC7-F624935D896A.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0
10 minutes ago, jdm said:

20 seconds of scotch brite, passed in one direction only.

You mean no fancy tools needed? :biggrin:

Is this what you mean?

34DCD2B8-DA31-4D0D-9719-C5CE7C07F5D0.thumb.jpeg.3349a49f95b662a3e95dd8aa92a14bdc.jpeg

 

 

 

Edited by AP1875

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I got the Scotch-Brite and it worked really well :-)

I have a few links with scratches and dents, the scratches will come out with cape cod but when it’s a little deeper like this what is used?

 

588753A1-5871-46F1-B2AE-22522CF9CF6A.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, AP1875 said:

I have a few links with scratches and dents, the scratches will come out with cape cod but when it’s a little deeper like this what is used?

Buff it first with rotary tool, a 5cm hard felt wheel and Dialux Orange works great. If you want it shine then polish with Dialux Blue, otherwise if it's a brushed purchase go directly to the green pad. There are also different grain pads for a finer finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 minutes ago, jdm said:

Buff it first with rotary tool, a 5cm hard felt wheel and Dialux Orange works great. If you want it shine then polish with Dialux Blue, otherwise if it's a brushed purchase go directly to the green pad. There are also different grain pads for a finer finish.

 Thanks for the info JDM. As you can probably tell this is a side of the watchmaking/restoring hobby i'm just starting to venture into. It does really interest me though. I'm going to buy some cheap bracelets from cousins scratch them up and see if i can get them looking 'new' again before i cause this bracelet anymore damage.

So, for the 5cm felt wheel would this be ok

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/050-to-0150mm-felt-wheels-made-in-uk

Dialux orange and blue

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/dialux-rouges

Any suggestions on a rotary tool?

Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
8 minutes ago, AP1875 said:

 I'm going to buy some cheap bracelets from cousins scratch them up and see if i can get them looking 'new' again before i cause this bracelet anymore damage.

Much better is to buy beaten up SS watches on Ebay. Restoring is not difficult, and very rewarding.

Quote

Any suggestions on a rotary tool?

Even cheap Chinese are OK. What you want is good mandrels for the wheels, also great is a support for the tool.

Edited by jdm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
13 minutes ago, jdm said:

Much better is to buy beaten up SS watches on Ebay. Restoring is not difficult, and very rewarding.

Even cheap Chinese are OK. What you want is good mandrels for the wheels, also great is a support for the tool.

Not really sure where to begin with selecting this type of tool but I guess my first question should be is this the type of tool required?

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/cousins-polishing-motor

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
16 minutes ago, AP1875 said:

Not really sure where to begin with selecting this type of tool but I guess my first question should be is this the type of tool required?

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/cousins-polishing-motor

That is a motor as I have, beside that you can get it for much less on AliX, rotary tool means something  hand held like a Dremel, Proxxon to mention brand names, but even a Chinese no name is OK, or a drill on an improvised support. Results mostly depend by case in question and technique, if you only have to restore you few pieces it's pointless to spend much. Get also smaller wheels as it's easier to do precise work and avoid edges.

Edited by jdm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
3 minutes ago, AP1875 said:

I do actually have a Dremel. It’s a rechargeable one.

https://www.dremeleurope.com/gb/en/dremel®micro-898-ocs-p/


I guess I need a bracket to mount it to a desk and something to hold the hard felt wheel.

Hopefully Dremel make both of these attachments.

Small repairs like the above can easily be done hand held. It's when working of deep dings or large areas (bracelet clasp are surprisingly time consuming) that a motor or a bracket really becomes really a saver. Don't forget to wear cotton gloves and work inside a cardboard box because is a bit of messy work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...