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Well, if you don't know anything at all about the brand of watch, all I can advise is to look at as many examples of the Real Thing as possible - hi-res photos from manufacturers' and sales catalogues taken from all angles - and then compare them with what you're thinking of buying. Easier if you're buying face-to-face than from an online site - and, if you intend to spend real money (IWC are very expensive watches), keep away from eBay unless you're dealing with a known and trusted seller.

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Coincidentally, following on from Jaycey's excellent posts about the Rolex, I was looking at IWC watches on a replica watch site this morning - out of curiosity. They're very good-looking replicas - Chinese movements in most of them - selling for something like $300 and, to the uninitiated, just like the real thing. The site is quite straightforward about the watches being replicas, and they describe the movements accurately - but lord knows what happens to them after they've been bought... :hair:

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Fakes avoid like the plague. My brother purchased a fake Breitling  (€35) it worked for a month then stopped. When I opened it the oscillating weight turned not in a bearing but in a brass type metal bush that had worn.  As far as I was concerned it not possible to repair economically.

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  • 1 year later...

 All things being equal, why did you select 5002?   When it comes to the expensive watches, you have to know your seller. In the past month I have bought for expensive watches from presumably trusted sellers. Two of the four were returned.   They claim  honest mistakes. 

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16 minutes ago, khergert said:

 All things being equal, why did you select 5002?   When it comes to the expensive watches, you have to know your seller. In the past month I have bought for expensive watches from presumably trusted sellers. Two of the four were returned.   They claim  honest mistakes. 

Thread is 20 months old, do not expect a reply. OP appears to be one one of these people that joins forum is desperation, and do not follow through.

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