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VWatchie

How to drown a watch movement in silicone oil

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As one would suspect this is gimmickry, The silicone oil is non conductive (fombilin) and therefore a quartz watch will work whilst immersed but as mentioned the long term effects of the oil on the working parts has yet to be determined. The extra drag applied to the gearwork will cause problems and probably over time ruin the case. The movements in the watches were Miyota and are genuine little workhorses in their own right and should not be subject to this sort of exposure. In conclusion NOT recommended for ANY watch.

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Watchmakers Hi there, Ressence have a mechanical oil filled watch with an ETA 2824-2. They have designed it so the area between dial and crystal is filled with oil and hydro sealed with only one shaft for minute hand coming through. Unbelievable looking dial. I like the idea check it out you may change your mind. 

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29 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

As one would suspect this is gimmickry, The silicone oil is non conductive (fombilin) and therefore a quartz watch will work whilst immersed but as mentioned the long term effects of the oil on the working parts has yet to be determined. The extra drag applied to the gearwork will cause problems and probably over time ruin the case. The movements in the watches were Miyota and are genuine little workhorses in their own right and should not be subject to this sort of exposure. In conclusion NOT recommended for ANY watch.

I'm truly mystified that the rotor in an analogue quartz watch would still turn with all of the extra drag imposed on it by being submersed in any liquid, it is designed to work in air.:wacko: I can see this working on a digital quartz watch but then only if the movement was specifically  designed for this use, i.e NO 'pressure' electrical contacts, all electrical connections being soldered or lazer welded and the layers of the display being edge sealed so that the oil could not get between them over time, but then one has to ask 'WHY?':mad:

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Seen it before. I think it could have started with Sinn watches. Think they have a watch with oil in. Called hydro or something like that. 

I know people have put oil in there Casio watches. 

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22 minutes ago, Graziano said:

Watchmakers Hi there, Ressence have a mechanical oil filled watch with an ETA 2824-2. They have designed it so the area between dial and crystal is filled with oil and hydro sealed with only one shaft for minute hand coming through. Unbelievable looking dial. I like the idea check it out you may change your mind

About what? Drowning a watch movement in silicone oil? Doing it properly (as you describe) is a completely different matter but drowning the entire movement in oil is just unbelievably unwise if you ask me.

Edited by VWatchie

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4 minutes ago, rogart63 said:

Seen it before. I think it could have started with Sinn watches. Think they have a watch with oil in. Called hydro or something like that. 

I know people have put oil in there Casio watches. 

But surely not the entire movement!? :startle:

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27 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

About what? Drowning a watch movement in silicone oil? Doing it properly (as you describe) is a completely different matter but drowning the entire movement in oil is just unbelievably unwise if you ask me.

:fpc:

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I think someone did an experiment on a Swedish watch forum . He first used an oil that was to thick . The watch didn't work . Changed to a  thinner  silicone oil. And that worked . Think it was a Casio . See if i can find it. 

Edited by rogart63

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Considering how much time and money we spend on quartz watch oiling (Moebius 9014) for optimum performance and battery life I just can't imagine that the movement wouldn't suffer badly from being drowned in silicone oil. I worry that some unsuspicious people simply will ruin their fine watches watching that video.

Personally I'd never try that gimmickry or recommend anyone else to do it.

Edited by VWatchie

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Just another gimmick. I am not about to go in to space, or down to depths of 1000m so why would I subject the watch to this treatment.
Yes, it probably works, but so does a Timex mechanical movement completely submerged in lighter fluid, as I have previously demonstrated. The fact that it works, doesn't mean you should do it.

I suspect these watches will run fine, but the long term effects are unknown. If you want to do it, give it a shot, but bear in mind that the lifespan of the watch may be affected, and that other than the "because I can" factor, there is no real benefit to it that I can see.

Having said all that. I do have a couple of clone  F-91Ws in my junk pile, and a bottle of 0W30 from the car, so if you see me heading off to the garden with a filler funnel, stop me. :D

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It's not even possible without leaving a pocket of air in there. Oil is incompressible. Unless you leave a pocket of air in there you ain't pulling out or pushing in the crown. Any pushers would be inoperable as well. 

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22 minutes ago, CaptCalvin said:

It's not even possible without leaving a pocket of air in there. Oil is incompressible. Unless you leave a pocket of air in there you ain't pulling out or pushing in the crown. Any pushers would be inoperable as well. 

I suppose if you leave a bubble there and a cross hair in the middle of the dial you could use it as a sprit level for your balance wheel poising ;)

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Actually this might make an amusing little project. I might give it a shot. I have a bunch of "junker" watches that I can use at practically zero cost. The poster of that video does mention that this may not be great for the watch, and he uses relatively cheap "victims".

I've also got a bunch of large needle syringes for inket printer cartridge refilling, and I've got a selection of various oils. Baby oil, 0W30 motor oil, silicone oil similar to the stuff in the video, and lets see what else I can think of. Mineral oils are probably not a great ides, though domestic heating oil (a form of kerosene) might be an interesting experiment, and I have about 1000 liters of that (well it is cold round here).

I've added it to my to do list. Don't hold your breath though, I'm hoping to do some dial fabrication experiments first based on those dial designs I posted while i was away on holiday. I'm waiting for some brass sheet to arrive, and looking for ideas to cut/punch clean 30mm disks without a hydraulic punch.


 I have a cheap half-round 30mm leather punch on its way, which I figure if sharpened and perhaps hardened should get through brass sheet around the 1mm thick marker. Whether it will produce clean and precise enough disks, I have no idea.

 

Edited by AndyHull

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6 hours ago, VWatchie said:

Well, I felt pretty upset watching this video as there's a real risk it might lead unsuspicious viewers to destroy their fine watches. What's your reaction?

 

    If they are any thing like "oil filled pressure gages" IT'S NOT GOOD !   vin

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AH, probably the thinnest easily available oil that is sometimes used for lubrication is de-odourised kerosine, often sold as BBQ lighter fuel ( a similar product is used to roll tin foil).  It will evaporate though.  Other option would be the thinnest 'liquid paraffin' (liq par BP light) you can find, there are several grades but most are quite thick.   Interested to see what you achieve.:cool:

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19 hours ago, canthus said:

AH, probably the thinnest easily available oil that is sometimes used for lubrication is de-odourised kerosine, often sold as BBQ lighter fuel ( a similar product is used to roll tin foil).  It will evaporate though.  Other option would be the thinnest 'liquid paraffin' (liq par BP light) you can find, there are several grades but most are quite thick.   Interested to see what you achieve.:cool:

   the oil filled pressure gauge has a simple mvt, not like a watch.  it is an attempt to "cusion" the simple mvt..  vin

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