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Did you fully wind it or was it already fully wound? If it was already then it could be the mainspring, or it could be the balance staff, or both. Not to mention many other potential Robles’s but those are the usual suspects. I suggest you remove the movement and start making your checks.

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Its possible if it isn't old/gunked up with grease that you could get it going again by gently tapping the balance wheel with a needle or fine toothpick. If it feels blocked, don't push it. If that is the case it will need a disassembly and clean.

Ocassionally things jam up even in well serviced watches, so it could be that it just needs a 'kick'.
It is more likely that it is old and needs a service.

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If the watch will run at all, even for a few seconds it will usually  respond  to cleaning. Most likely  as previously  mentioned  it is dirt and fossilized lubricant. Of course  there could  be a mechanical  failure  as well. But this is less likely. 

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On 2/13/2020 at 10:49 PM, mineglobus03 said:

Hi everyone, I have some problems with a manual winding watch. It needs some work but I would try to do it myself. The watch appears fully wound but it doesn't work. Which is the problem? Thank you in advance

Alessandro

It probably needs a service. I.e., take the movement of of the case, dip it up and down in a bowl of naphtha, dry it with a hair blower, take some oil (use olive oil if that's all you have) and put some here and there. Place the movement back in the case and you're done.

Seriously, it can be very hard to tell what the problem is. If you want it to work, work well and DIY, I recommend watchrepairlessons.com. However, be warned, watch repairing is extremely addictive!

Good luck!

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Looks like the OP,  just like most others one-posting new members, has moved on with other things in his life and won't bother providing updates.

Everyone deserves respect but the statistically only a minority of the people showing up here have the focus, time and (small) funds needed to go from a casual curiosity to an hobby or learning path.

 

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I definitely agree, everyone deserves respect. My post was just an attempt, perhaps a clumsy attempt, to be a bit funny. It’s interesting to see how the human mind see’s no or little complexity in the fields it has no knowledge. Perhaps a good thing or we would be too intimidated to start any new endeavors .

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On 3/22/2020 at 3:06 PM, jdm said:

Looks like the OP,  just like most others one-posting new members, has moved on with other things in his life and won't bother providing updates.

Everyone deserves respect but the statistically only a minority of the people showing up here have the focus, time and (small) funds needed to go from a casual curiosity to an hobby or learning path.

 

yes its a shame when it happens, I'm not on here as much i would like to be as my work takes me away etc etc, although from a humble and small curiosity in horology I'm now neck deep in parts, tools, website addresses and a couple of lathes, not to mention a few clocks, which by the way the wife would like rid of but I'm keeping.

As for the OP question I'm saying its in need of a good service, so apart it comes I'm afraid. 

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