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adamb11

Assembling a watch from ebay parts

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I am newer to watch repair but very experienced with mechanics and I have a well suited workshop.  I am doing a restoration on an old pierce and my 14 year old daughter took interest in the project.  So I started a project with her, building a watch from new ebay parts.  We selected a simple movement (17 jewel #6497) that we took apart and put back together.  She enjoyed it.  So I am collecting the parts needed to make it into a watch she can wear.  I purchased a case that is designed to fit this movement.  It did come with a face ring and a movement holder.  But I think I need something else.  When I assemble it the movement is up against the glass. 

How should I space it off the glass correctly?

Am I missing parts?

Is that small thin ring going in place of the dial or is it a gasket for the back case to press against the movement holder and let it turn as it presses.

 

Movement "Golden hollow 6497" here 

Case is here

 

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1 hour ago, adamb11 said:

Is that small thin ring going in place of the dial or is it a gasket for the back case to press against the movement holder and let it turn as it presses.

It's a throttle twin-body adapter...

No, seriously... it's the "dial in-lieu" spacer. Check that the stem is well centered in the tube? That is your cue regarding how high the mov't should sit. And if if doesn't you'll have to fabricate something.

Ladies are lucky in which they can wear watches of any size. And your daughter even more as she got a dad teaching her how to make her own.

 

Edited by jdm

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So you don't think there is any standard spacer that could be found?  It will be visible so I would like it to be not "home made" (not by my hands).

Is that small thin ring for up at the crystal, similar to the spacing a dial would make?

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I built a custom watch using nearly identical parts but my problem was different. My dial wasn't meant for wristwatches and was significantly thicker. The case back wouldn't close all the way.  I had to remove tons of material from the overall thickness of the spacer ring.

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If the watch fits the case,and the stem lines  up  it may  be something  as easy as crystal  replacement .I suspect  you have a flat  mineral  glass  crystal, is that  correct? If so you  could  replace it with domed acrylic. This would give  you hand clearance.there as pros and cons  to both  types but since you already  have all the other  parts. This might be a practical  way to go.

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This is a high dome.this type is used with older mechanicals. There are low  domes  as well. You might have to experiment  a bit  to get the right height to clear  the hands without going  too high.If you can get  those downdrafts  working  you can do  this. 

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Edited by yankeedog

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First, Thank you, this is very helpful.

The wire idea may be a great way to go.  I have a huge hand press (for car restoration stuff).  I could figure out the exact thickness I need and press a nice brass wire to the correct thickness.  I do also have access to lathes (and I have some basic experience) if I have to go that route.

The thick brass movement holder has slots that are bent up on it.  What are those for?  Should they go towards the case back and then do they compress a bit like a spring/crush washer to create compression?

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9 hours ago, SparkyLB said:

FLwatchguy73, that is one incredibly beautiful dial!

Thank you. I searched for months before I found it. It's a true Frankenwatch with Swiss, American, Chinese and Russian parts. To @adamb11, what dial have you selected if any? As a heads up, the dial I used was from an american 12s pocket watch. It fit great minus the dial feet and the modification to the spacer ring. Mine was made from steel unlike your brass one, so removing material took a bit more effort. A watch with a skeleton movement does deserve to be shown off and there are skeleton type dials available for that movement.

 

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Is it me or do i see some carbs on that bench. Those cases should come with tabs to space it correctly. Iam guessing the kit didn’t come with any? It does look like the movement ring is made to accommodate a tension wire ring which will not help you here. One thing you can do that will be easier than pressing a wire in the case would be to swap out the crystal to higher domed crystal. Did the case come with a sapphire glass or mineral?

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yeah I'm a big car guy.  That's a whole side of a Porsche 911 on the wall above it.  

The watch wasn't a kit.  I'm purchasing parts, which is why this finagling is needed. I purchase a sapphire crystal in this case.  I could purchase a domed one.  How are Crystals replaced.  I do have a case press.  Is it simply pressing the old one out and then pressing in a new one with either an adhesive or gasket?

 

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2 minutes ago, adamb11 said:

How are Crystals replaced.  I do have a case press.  Is it simply pressing the old one out and then pressing in a new one with either an adhesive or gasket?

Crystal glue is commonly called cement and was used before nylon gaskets became ubiquitous, so today the latter is used as much is possible.
And the mov't ring should be tight in the case, typical parts saving technique is to use plastic or springy tabs as above. 

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Acrylic domed crystals  are installed  with a crystal  lift, they are compressed  before inserting..the compression  is then released  and they expand  into place.nice tight fit ,no gaskets. As for removing the old crystals  you were born with two removal  tools. They are attached  to the side of your hands.

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12 hours ago, yankeedog said:

Acrylic domed crystals  are installed  with a crystal  lift, they are compressed  before inserting..the compression  is then released  and they expand  into place.nice tight fit ,no gaskets.

Correct. But there is also an other way, using proper dies on a press, as shown in the attached document.8836_Sternkreuz R19 Snap In Glasses Pages 12 to 29.pdf

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3 minutes ago, yankeedog said:

Could  not the crystal  lift give a tighter  fit, because  it temporarily  reduces  circumference   ?

Are you asking about press and shaped dies? These also temporarily reduce the circumference due to their shape . But I still have to try that. 

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I have  not used the dies .It was just  my assumption  that since they pushed straight  in that a slightly  over sized crystal  could  not be installed.   I think that when installing  a crystal  with  no inner  ring , that  a crystal  lift would work better  ,however  when installing  a crystal  with a retainer  ring  the die press would  have the advantage..   In such  instances  such as a vostok  amphibia  crystal  I have used a drill press. The die being  a socket. With a piece  of plastic  to prevent  scratches. 

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17 minutes ago, adamb11 said:

I successfully made a shim from a piece of wire and the movement is centered.  It came out great.  Next is cutting the stem to the correct length and attaching the crown.  Tips?

Glad to know my suggestion worked. Cutting a stem (non screw crown) is real easy.

 

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That great.  Thanks.  I was more concerned abut the end of the threads then needed I guess.  usually when I cut threads I put a nut on to unwind and straighten them or get a file under a magnifying glass and straighten it.

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5 hours ago, adamb11 said:

That great.  Thanks.  I was more concerned abut the end of the threads then needed I guess.  usually when I cut threads I put a nut on to unwind and straighten them or get a file under a magnifying glass and straighten it.

Don't worry, stem threading is so small that no matter how you cut it it will screw in just fine, even without the good practice of giving it a touch of filing.

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