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monathan

Clock chiming all the quarters, confused, on the hour

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I have a wall clock, westminster chimes, which I have had for about 20 years. It's about 3' tall and pendulum operated, 3 springs to wind for the mechanism. Specifically a Howard Miller Westmont 613-110 model.  The mechanism might be SPS02 54cm 354 560 (well, that's what is on the back on it).

Recently it started mis-chiming.  That is to say that when the hour occurs, the chiming isn't the 16 chimes of the westminster sequence, it's more like 30 or 40 chimes in what appears to be fairly random order. This is then followed by the strokes for the hour.

It's not easy to categorise, but I suspect that often the quarters aren't chiming, only the hour, although, every now and again, a quarter chimes out perfectly.

Any suggestions or comments?

Monathan

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When a clock starts to become unreliable it can mean its time for a clean. With a chime you have three trains, you need to remove it from its case and check it, look for wear as over the years holes and pivots become worn. Let the power off from the three springs first and then check. A few photos of front and back of the movement minus the dial and hands would be nice. If you do not know how to let the power down, let me know, with the photos I can help you do this.

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5 hours ago, oldhippy said:

When a clock starts to become unreliable it can mean its time for a clean. With a chime you have three trains, you need to remove it from its case and check it, look for wear as over the years holes and pivots become worn. Let the power off from the three springs first and then check. A few photos of front and back of the movement minus the dial and hands would be nice. If you do not know how to let the power down, let me know, with the photos I can help you do this.

  what is the safest way to let the power down?    vin

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Hi  Its as Old hippy says its either dirty or worn or even bone dry.  Take the movement from the case and before doing anything remove the power from the three springs. The cheap way of doing that is to get about six inches of broom handle.  now and cut a slot in it at one end so you can insert the key handle (the butterfly) well into the slot.   You now have a cheap let down tool. 

Next remove the hands and dial and inspect the clock for worn pivot holes and general condition.  Insert the key onto the winding squares and apply power and release the click from the ratchet and allow it to run down using your hand on the handle to act as a brake.  Once all power is removed thououghly check all the gear work and levers for wear and operability then we are into part 2.    As old hippy remarked at this point with it out of the case and powered down Some pictures of the front and back would be usefull 

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