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 I inherited this staking tool from my dad. I am torn. It is super cool looking! But we have no use for it at home because no one else in the family knows how to repair watches/clocks.

My question is:

It is a bit dirty and maybe rusty too. If I wanted to sell it, would I get more if it is clean or if it is dirty and rusty?

 

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 I inherited this staking tool from my dad. I am torn. It is super cool looking! But we have no use for it at home because no one else in the family knows how to repair watches/clocks.
My question is:
It is a bit dirty and maybe rusty too. If I wanted to sell it, would I get more if it is clean or if it is dirty and rusty?
 
20200201_150645.thumb.jpg.bec4f7de92e0d143670d939881a9a140.jpg

I agree with makr and OH. Clean it. But, do be careful not to grind and misshape any of the stakes. The value comes from its utility. The cleaning will increase the price, no doubt. It looks like a nice set! Good luck!

Did your dad leave anything else to you? If he had a staking set like that, he must have had a use for it.


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It's not a bad idea to clean it up but bear in mind you have something like 200 pieces there. As said above you don't want to affect the original functional surfaces, so a gentle method like steel wool and oil to remove rust. Any pitting will be left but that's better than digging deeper. At 2 minutes per part you're looking at 7 hours of work and fairly well beaten up fingers, so ask yourself if it's worth it for 50-75 bucks more when it sells, if it even makes a difference.

Personally I prefer buying equipment grungy but original rather than shiny but less functional.

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2 hours ago, nickelsilver said:

It's not a bad idea to clean it up but bear in mind you have something like 200 pieces there.

As the usual you're on the spot exactly. I wanted to clean my set which is like 50 pieces, and stupidly put them in a cookie box with alcohol and let it rest for the night. The box plating left for to the stakes in form of a sturdy black! I was able to restore completely with green cleaning pad on a rotary tool, but it took forever! That to say that is not just just about cleaning and the time involved, but also knowing how to do it, something which not everyone is supposed to know well.

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/6/2020 at 6:12 PM, ITProDad said:


I agree with makr and OH. Clean it. But, do be careful not to grind and misshape any of the stakes. The value comes from its utility. The cleaning will increase the price, no doubt. It looks like a nice set! Good luck!

Did your dad leave anything else to you? If he had a staking set like that, he must have had a use for it.


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Hi,

He left all his other watch repair items too. But they are newer and not as interesting as this piece.

 

L

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