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FLwatchguy73

1971 Rolex on Antiques Roadshow

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I don't find that so strange. In the past Rolex had prices aligned with other makers, $345 in 1974 are about $1,780 of today, which is like 10 times more what a normal person would pay for a watch or smartphone, and would buy you a nice Swiss chronograph. As a young man he took an uncommon decision of spending a month salary or more for it,  having done the same at about the same age I understand that perfectly. 

Then the watch has been valued so high first  because of the general crazyness about the  brand, and then because drooling collectors have decided that just because few dials have been printed like that, they must have higher intrinsic value.

I am happy for the owner and I whish him the best health and wealth, but I am afraid that if he decides to sell it he could find that reality of doing that is a quite different from the parking lot show put together for television. 

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1 hour ago, oldhippy said:

Seriously though, who the heck sits on a Rolex watch for nearly 50 years and never wears it.

Someone with plenty of money.:D

Certainly not the case here and it turned to be a very wise decision. Even by the rich collectors of today its commonly done, they call them drawers queens. 

Edited by jdm

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On ‎1‎/‎31‎/‎2020 at 1:42 AM, jdm said:

Certainly not the case here and it turned to be a very wise decision. Even by the rich collectors of today its commonly done, they call them drawers queens. 

I always found that part of watch collecting a bit depressing.  In the collector's eye the best watch is the unloved one- bought and never worn.  (sigh)

I had to tune in for the episode though.  Gorgeous watch (although I like the model 6239 better).  It wouldn't surprise me if it goes for over a million USD at auction.  It was a very sound investment.

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People are doubting the authenticity of the watch, specifically whether it is truly "unworn". You can purchase blank genuine documents online all day long and the case back sticker does indeed show signs of wear and the dial shows what appears to be dust particles on close inspection which means it may have also been serviced. Time will tell I suppose.

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This guy makes some interesting observations regarding the back story and the alleged unworn status of the watch.

I wouldn't know either way but it's always interesting to get another perspective.

 

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