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7S26 balance collet


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 Is there a special tool to turn the collet which has a tapered shape without a slot.  I also believe the hair spring is held on by glue. 

On Seiko there is usually a beat adjuster. It is where the hairspring is attached to the balance cock. It can be moved by VERY CAREFULLY pushing it one way or the other to adjust the beat error. I’m assuming the reason you want to move the collet is to adjust the position of the balance table pin?


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The beat adjuster stud was  out together with hairspring. That,s the reason for asking a way to move the collet for in beat alignment. Thank you for the feedback.

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33 minutes ago, Elton said:

The beat adjuster stud was  out together with hairspring. That,s the reason for asking a way to move the collet for in beat alignment. Thank you for the feedback.

As mentioned, with a moveable end stud arm, beat error is adjusted there. For the 7S26 there are two types of end stud, not sure what do you mean that it was out. 

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1 hour ago, Elton said:

The beat adjuster stud was  out together with hairspring. That,s the reason for asking a way to move the collet for in beat alignment. Thank you for the feedback.

Are you saying the entire balance and spring is separated from the cock? If so reattach the stud to the adjusting arm, then regulate from there. There should not be glue there but Bergeon makes a set of hairspring collect pliers, they are quite expensive though.

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5 minutes ago, Elton said:

I removed the hair spring n stud because the spring was tangled up by accident. 

Ok so iam guessing you need to remove the hairspring in order to fix it.  Hairspring issues are a common problem with the 7s26. 

There are two levers you can use to remove the hairspring.

Edited by saswatch88
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